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Energy Notes: November 2007-2008

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Mar 2009

Mineral Resource of the Month: Iodine

Désirée E. Polyak, a mineral commodity specialist for the U.S. Geological Survey, compiled the following information on iodine, an essential trace element vital to the production of thyroid hormones.

14 Mar 2009

Benchmarks: March 1, 1872: "Bone Wars" heat up

By Brian Fisher Johnson

Edward Drinker Cope stood before a smoke-filled audience at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia, Pa., on March 1, 1872. One of the nation’s leading paleontologists, Cope would present his latest fossil find: an extinct flying reptile he designated Ornithochirus. Certainly the piece would be recognized as a major contribution to the scientific understanding of ancient life. More importantly, Cope thought, he would receive credit as its discoverer.

27 Feb 2009

Down to Earth With: New congressional science fellows

Last month, a new Congress and president came to Washington, D.C. And with them came new staff, including five geoscience congressional science fellows. The fellows will take their scientific prowess to the Hill, and will use their training to work with senators, representatives and committees on policy issues. But the transition from field boot to suit jacket won’t be easy, they told EARTH reporter Brian Fisher Johnson.

23 Feb 2009

Energy Notes: October 2007-2008

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Feb 2009

Mineral Resource of the Month: Lime

“Lime” is not itself a mineral and is never found in a natural state. Instead it is a commercial product used for millennia in everything from building construction to paper-making to fertilizer.

 
14 Feb 2009

Down to Earth With: John Copeland

Movie effects have come a long way since the close-shot model explosions that made “Star Wars” a hit, and science documentaries are no exception, says John Copeland, a director and producer who has worked on such shows as “Babylon 5,” “Dinosaur Planet” and “When Dinosaurs Roamed America.” Copeland explains to EARTH reporter Brian Fisher Johnson how TV drama and computer effects have revolutionized the way documentarians portray science.

23 Jan 2009

Energy Notes: September 2007-2008

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Jan 2009

Mineral Resource of the Month: Gold

Gold has been highly valued for thousands of years because of its scarcity, durability and characteristic yellow color — reminiscent of the sun, which some early civilizations worshipped as a deity. Crude forms of gold jewelry and money originated soon after the founding of the first cities, around 4000 B.C. People first recovered gold from streambed gravels (placer deposits), where it occurred as metallic nuggets. Gold nuggets have long been prized possessions because they can be used without complicated processing — easily fashioned into bars of different standard weights and into ornaments and jewelry that served as portable wealth. For more than five millennia, until well into the 20th century, jewelry, coinage and currency backing were the only important uses of gold.

 
14 Jan 2009

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