Taxonomy term

usgs

Mineral Resource of the Month: Vanadium

Vanadium was first discovered by Andrés Manuel del Río in Mexico City in 1801. He called it erythronium, from the Greek word erythros, meaning red, for the color that it turned when it was heated. However, it wasn’t immediately accepted as a new element. Four years later, French chemist Hippolyte Victor Collet-Descotils declared that del Río’s new element was only impure chromium. Accepting Collet-Descotils’ assessment, del Río withdrew his claim. In 1831, Swedish chemist Nils Gabriel Sefström rediscovered vanadium in a new oxide while working with iron ores. In the same year, German chemist Friedrich Wöhler reinvestigated del Río’s original sample and found that Sefström’s vanadium was identical to del Río’s erythronium. In 1867, the metal was first isolated by Sir Henry Enfield Roscoe by reducing vanadium trichloride with hydrogen gas. The vanadium mineral, roscoelite, was named in honor of Roscoe’s work.

 
12 Jan 2013

Energy Notes: August 2011-2012

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
19 Dec 2012

Mineral Resource of the Month: Soda Ash

Natural soda ash, sodium carbonate, is an alkali chemical refined from the mineral trona or from naturally occurring sodium carbonate-bearing brines. Synthetic soda ash is sodium carbonate that has been manufactured from one of several chemical processes. Whether natural or synthetic, soda ash is an essential raw material in the production of flat glass and fiberglass — both of which are used by the domestic automotive and construction industries. Soda ash is also used to produce chemicals, detergents and other important industrial products. 

 
13 Dec 2012

Energy Notes: July 2011-2012

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
19 Nov 2012

Mineral Resource of the Month: Mercury

Since at least Roman times, mercury has been used for amalgamation with gold. The Romans used mercury from cinnabar — the most important ore of mercury — from Almadén, Spain, home to the world’s oldest producing mercury mine. That use continued through the Middle Ages and the Colonial era. Mercury from Almadén was used mainly for Spanish colonial silver processing in the New World until the discovery of rich cinnabar deposits at Huancavelica, Peru, which provided a regional source for the vital metal. The Spanish site is still important. Since 1927, in conformance with the system used at Almadén, the “flask” has been the unit for measuring and pricing mercury. One flask weighs 34.5 kilograms; 29 flasks are contained in a metric ton.

 
13 Nov 2012

Energy Notes: June 2011-2012

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
19 Oct 2012

Mineral Resource of the Month: Dimension Stone

Dimension stone is not actually any one type of rock. Instead, it is any natural rock material quarried for the purpose of obtaining blocks or slabs that meet certain size (width, length and thickness) and shape specifications needed for building. Color, grain texture and pattern, surface finish, durability, strength and the ability of the stone to take a polish are also important selection criteria.

 
13 Oct 2012

Energy Notes: May 2011-2012

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
19 Sep 2012

Mineral Resource of the Month: Tungsten

Tungsten, sometimes called wolfram, is a metal only found naturally in chemical compounds, such as in the ore minerals wolframite and scheelite. Tungsten has the highest melting point and one of the highest densities of all metals. When combined with carbon, it forms a compound that is almost as hard as diamond. These and other properties make it useful in a wide variety of important commercial, industrial and military applications. 

 
13 Sep 2012

Energy Notes: April 2011-2012

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
19 Aug 2012

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