Taxonomy term

usgs

Mineral Resource of the Month: Iron Ore

In nature, elemental iron is found largely in either magnetite or hematite, both iron ore minerals. Nearly all iron ore — whether used directly as lump ore or converted to briquettes, concentrates, pellets or sinter — is used to make steel. In the United States, steelmaking accounts for almost 99 percent of iron ore consumption. Minor amounts are consumed in the production of cast iron, cement, magnets and jewelry. There are eight major iron ore mines in the United States — all surface mining operations — two in Michigan and six in Minnesota. 

 
14 Jan 2010

Energy Notes: August 2008-2009

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Dec 2009

Mineral Resource of the Month: Diamond

Diamond is an extremely stable form of carbon: It is a material with superior physical properties due to the very strong covalent bonding between the carbon atoms. Diamond has the highest hardness and thermal conductivity of any known natural or synthesized material. In diamond, the carbon atoms are arranged in a rigid cubic crystal structure called a diamond lattice — it is this lattice that blocks impurities, thus giving diamond its colorless appearance.

 
14 Dec 2009

Energy Notes: July 2008-2009

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Nov 2009

Mineral Resource of the Month: Zinc

Zinc is the fourth most-widely consumed metal, following iron, aluminum and copper. The Romans were the first to use zinc. To produce brass, they smelted copper with calamine (a zinc ore) to make an alloy more golden in color than bronze (a copper-tin alloy), which they called calamine brass. They were unaware zinc was involved.

 
14 Nov 2009

Energy Notes: June 2008-2009

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Oct 2009

Mineral Resource of the Month: Gallium

The metal element gallium occurs in very small concentrations in rocks and ores of other metals — native gallium is not known. As society gets more and more high-tech, gallium becomes more useful. Gallium is one of only five metals that are liquid at or close to room temperature. It has one of the longest liquid ranges of any metal (29.8 degrees Celsius to 2204 degrees Celsius) and has a low vapor pressure even at high temperatures. Ultra-pure gallium has a brilliant silvery appearance, and the solid metal exhibits conchoidal fracture similar to glass.

 
14 Oct 2009

Energy Notes: May 2008-2009

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Sep 2009

Mineral Resource of the Month: Cobalt

Cobalt is a metal used in numerous commercial, industrial and military applications. On a global basis, the leading use of cobalt is in rechargeable lithium-ion, nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride battery electrodes. Cobalt use has grown rapidly since the early 1990s, with the development of new battery technologies and an increase in demand for portable electronics such as cell phones, laptop computers and cordless power tools.

 
14 Sep 2009

Energy Notes: April 2008-2009

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Aug 2009

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