Taxonomy term

usgs

Mineral Resource of the Month: Lead

Lead is a corrosion-resistant, dense, ductile and malleable blue-gray metal that has been used by humans for more than 5,000 years. Humans first used it in decorative fixtures, roofs, pipes and windows. Today, its primary use is in lead-acid batteries.

 
14 Oct 2010

Energy Notes: May 2009-2010

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Sep 2010

Mineral Resource of the Month: Fluorspar

The term “fluorspar” refers to crude or beneficiated material that is mined and/or milled for the mineral fluorite (calcium fluoride). Fluorite is a nonmetallic mineral, containing 51.1 percent calcium and 48.9 percent fluorine. Industry practice has established three grades of fluorspar: acid grade (containing more than 97 percent calcium fluoride), ceramic grade (85 to 95 percent calcium fluoride) and metallurgical grade (normally 60 to 85 percent calcium fluoride). Fluorspar’s uses have grown and changed in the last 100 years; today, the most important markets are fluorochemical production, aluminum refining and steelmaking.

 
14 Sep 2010

Energy Notes: April 2009-2010

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Aug 2010

Mineral Resource of the Month: Perlite

Formed from viscous lava, perlite is a volcanic glass of rhyolitic composition that contains between 2 and 5 percent water. Most volcanic glasses contain some water, including obsidian (less than 1 percent) and pitchstone (up to 10 percent). Although the exact formation process for perlite is debated, it is theorized that the lava that formed perlite was deposited and cooled near the surface and hydrated over time. Pumice is closely related to perlite in composition but, because of the explosive way in which pumice forms, the rapidly cooling lava entrains air and becomes much less dense than perlite.

 
14 Aug 2010

Energy Notes: March 2009-2010

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Jul 2010

Mineral Resource of the Month: Platinum Group Metals

The platinum group metals (PGMs) are among the rarest mineral commodities in Earth’s crust. They include iridium, osmium, palladium, platinum, rhodium and ruthenium. 

 
14 Jul 2010

Energy Notes: February 2009-2010

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Jun 2010

Mineral Resource of the Month: Germanium

Germanium is a grayish-white, hard, brittle element with electrical properties between those of a metal and an insulator. Germanium is metallic in appearance and is consumed as a pure metal or in compound form, depending on the application. Germanium is never found as a pure metal in nature, but trace amounts occur in many minerals, including common metallic ore minerals such as the zinc mineral sphalerite. Zinc smelters produce the majority of the world’s supply of germanium. Germanium is also recovered from fly ash produced by the burning of certain types of coal.

 
14 Jun 2010

Mineral Resource of the Month: Sulfur

Sulfur is one of the few solid elements that are found in elemental form in nature, and it has been used in industrial processes since ancient times. The Egyptians used sulfur compounds to bleach fabric as early as 2000 B.C.; the ancient Greeks used sulfur as a disinfectant; and the Romans used it in pharmaceutical applications. When the Chinese developed gunpowder in the 13th century, sulfur was an essential component. The Industrial Revolution expanded demand for sulfur used in the production of sulfuric acid, an essential component of myriad industrial processes.

 
14 Jun 2010

Pages