Taxonomy term

agi

Mineral Resource of the Month: Bromine

Bromine, a naturally occurring element, is comparatively rare in Earth’s crust, but is found as a dissolved species in seawater, saltwater lakes and underground brines associated with petroleum deposits. Seawater contains about 65 parts per million of bromine — or an estimated 100 trillion tons, whereas the highly salty Dead Sea is estimated to contain 1 billion tons of bromine. Bromine is also recovered from seawater as a co-product during evaporation to produce salt. 

 
14 Apr 2009

Energy Notes: November 2007-2008

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Mar 2009

Mineral Resource of the Month: Iodine

Désirée E. Polyak, a mineral commodity specialist for the U.S. Geological Survey, compiled the following information on iodine, an essential trace element vital to the production of thyroid hormones.

14 Mar 2009

Energy Notes: October 2007-2008

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Feb 2009

Mineral Resource of the Month: Lime

“Lime” is not itself a mineral and is never found in a natural state. Instead it is a commercial product used for millennia in everything from building construction to paper-making to fertilizer.

 
14 Feb 2009

Energy Notes: September 2007-2008

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Jan 2009

Mineral Resource of the Month: Gold

Gold has been highly valued for thousands of years because of its scarcity, durability and characteristic yellow color — reminiscent of the sun, which some early civilizations worshipped as a deity. Crude forms of gold jewelry and money originated soon after the founding of the first cities, around 4000 B.C. People first recovered gold from streambed gravels (placer deposits), where it occurred as metallic nuggets. Gold nuggets have long been prized possessions because they can be used without complicated processing — easily fashioned into bars of different standard weights and into ornaments and jewelry that served as portable wealth. For more than five millennia, until well into the 20th century, jewelry, coinage and currency backing were the only important uses of gold.

 
14 Jan 2009

Energy Notes: August 2007-2008

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Dec 2008

Mineral Resource of the Month: Iron Oxide Pigments

Iron oxide pigments, which may be natural or synthetic, have been used as colorants since early humans began painting on cave walls. Natural pigments are derived from several iron oxide minerals: Red pigments are derived from hematite. Yellow and brown pigments — ochres, sierras and umbers — are derived from limonite. Magnetite provides a black iron oxide pigment. Micaceous iron oxide is a special form of hematite that occurs in thin metallic gray platelets or flakes. Synthetic pigments are manufactured under controlled conditions such that particle size, distribution and shape can be accurately replicated, resulting in superior uniformity, color quality and chemical purity. 

 
20 Dec 2008

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