Taxonomy term

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Energy Notes: September 2009-2010

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Jan 2011

Mineral Resource of the Month: Molybdenum

Molybdenum is a silvery-white, malleable metal that does not occur in metallic form in nature. Although a number of molybdenum-bearing minerals have been identified, only one has commercial significance: molybdenite, a natural molybdenum sulfide. Molybdenite concentrate is converted to molybdic oxide, which in turn is used to produce intermediate products, such as ferromolybdenum, metal powder and various chemicals.

 
14 Jan 2011

Energy Notes: August 2009-2010

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Dec 2010

Mineral Resource of the Month: Clay Minerals

Clays were one of the first mineral commodities used by people. Clay pottery has been found in archeological sites that are 12,000 years old, and clay figurines have been found in sites that are even older. One of the most famous examples is the 2,200-year-old army of terracotta (clay) warriors — 8,000 of them — found in Shaanxi Province, China. Today, the production of clays is among the largest of the world’s minerals industries, exceeding 1 billion metric tons per year. Clays are used in everything from shampoo to kitty litter to pottery to cement.

 
14 Dec 2010

Energy Notes: July 2009-2010

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Nov 2010

Energy Notes: June 2009-2010

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Oct 2010

Mineral Resource of the Month: Silicon

Silicon is classified as a metalloid element because it has properties of both metals and nonmetals. As the second-most abundant element in Earth’s crust — second only to oxygen — it accounts for more than 25 percent of the crust by weight. By mass, silicon is the eighth-most common element in the universe. Yet it is rarely found free in nature. Rather, it occurs chiefly in silicate minerals, such as feldspars, hornblendes, phyllosilicates, the serpentine group of minerals and micas, and in quartz and microcrystalline forms of quartz, such as agate and flint. These minerals are found in many different rocks, including granites and schists. Sand is commonly composed of small particles of quartz. 

 
14 Oct 2010

Mineral Resource of the Month: Lead

Lead is a corrosion-resistant, dense, ductile and malleable blue-gray metal that has been used by humans for more than 5,000 years. Humans first used it in decorative fixtures, roofs, pipes and windows. Today, its primary use is in lead-acid batteries.

 
14 Oct 2010

Energy Notes: May 2009-2010

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 
20 Sep 2010

Mineral Resource of the Month: Fluorspar

The term “fluorspar” refers to crude or beneficiated material that is mined and/or milled for the mineral fluorite (calcium fluoride). Fluorite is a nonmetallic mineral, containing 51.1 percent calcium and 48.9 percent fluorine. Industry practice has established three grades of fluorspar: acid grade (containing more than 97 percent calcium fluoride), ceramic grade (85 to 95 percent calcium fluoride) and metallurgical grade (normally 60 to 85 percent calcium fluoride). Fluorspar’s uses have grown and changed in the last 100 years; today, the most important markets are fluorochemical production, aluminum refining and steelmaking.

 
14 Sep 2010

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