Taxonomy term

june 2018

Getting there and getting around Idaho

If you’re interested in a trip down the Main Salmon, you have two options: put a trip together yourself, or hire a professional outfitter to take you.

06 Jun 2018

Travels in Geology: Rafting the Salmon River through the Idaho Batholith

Rafting down the Main Salmon River, which courses north and then west across northern Idaho, takes you by Precambrian metamorphics and the granites of the Idaho Batholith. Six to eight days later, your trip concludes as you float past what was once the edge of North America, and over former island arcs sutured onto the continent during the Mesozoic.
06 Jun 2018

Solar eclipse mimics conditions on Mars

What does a total solar eclipse here on Earth have to do with studying life on Mars? The answer lies nearly 25 kilometers above Earth’s surface in the stratosphere, where the August 2017 eclipse offered researchers a rare opportunity to mimic conditions on the Red Planet.

05 Jun 2018

Comment: Could NASA find evidence of extraterrestrial life by 2050?

Two upcoming missions will provide the first systematic approach to searching the atmospheres of exoplanets for signs of life — and they could find it in the next several decades.

04 Jun 2018

Taking the surprise out of sneaker waves

Since 2005, more than two dozen confirmed fatalities in California and Oregon have been caused by so-called sneaker waves, which surge far ashore with little warning, sometimes catching beachgoers by surprise. Most beaches in the Pacific Northwest and California have posted signs warning visitors of the hazard, but few scientific studies have been done on sneaker waves and, currently, there is no consensus on their definition or origin. 

01 Jun 2018

Where on Earth? - June 2018

Where on Earth was this picture taken? Use these clues to guess and submit your answer via mail, email or Web by the last day of the month (June 30, 2018).

01 Jun 2018

Airport earthquakes continued after injection ended

Since Oct. 31, 2008, when seismic activity was first detected, hundreds of earthquakes smaller than magnitude 3.4 have peppered a fault zone that partly underlies the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in north-central Texas. After the quakes were linked to the subsurface disposal of wastewater fluids from oil and gas operations in wells located within a kilometer of the initial quakes, wastewater injections into those wells were halted in August 2009. 

31 May 2018

Which warm waters boosted Hurricane Harvey?

Last August, Hurricane Harvey walloped Texas, dropping more than 100 centimeters of rain on Houston and nearby areas, and causing more than $125 billion in damage. But almost nobody saw it coming. In the days before Harvey made landfall 60 kilometers east of Corpus Christi, the tropical storm barely registered as a threat, but within 30 hours it escalated from a tropical storm into a Category 4 hurricane. Using data collected before and during the storm, scientists are piecing together how Harvey became so ferocious so fast, an effort that could help scientists better predict which future storms might have similarly rapid intensifications.

30 May 2018

"Greening" stormwater in Philadelphia

When environmental geologist David Wilcots joined Sci-Tek Consultants in 2014, he became involved with the Philadelphia Water Department’s Green Stormwater Infrastructure project. Sci-Tek’s goal was to redesign certain areas of the city’s urban landscape so that “less stormwater goes into the sewage system” and more goes into the ground, explains Wilcots. 

29 May 2018

Down to Earth With: Geologist and paleontologist David Wilcots

When David Wilcots was 4 years old, his parents took him to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City where he encountered his first giant dinosaur skeleton: a roughly 27-meter-long sauropod named Apatosaurus (though at the time it was still popularly known as Brontosaurus). “That just blew my mind,” he remembers. His passion for paleontology grew, branching from dinosaurs into early mammals, and led him to major in geology at Temple University in Philadelphia. In 1988, he earned a master’s in geology at Fort Hays State University in Kansas. But then, things didn’t go as planned. “When I got out of grad school, I looked for jobs in paleo, but couldn’t find any,” he recalls. “Environmental geology was the next best thing.” He began consulting with business and government agencies, and as time went on, his second choice of career grew on him.

29 May 2018

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