Taxonomy term

january 2015

Geomedia: Books: A brief history of our cosmic origins

In the 1980 television show “Cosmos,” astronomer Carl Sagan famously noted: “The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” This scientifically and philosophically profound concept — that we are starstuff through and through — has been known for less than 50 years, and the history of its discovery was fraught with naysayers.

21 Jan 2015

Protecting the mineral treasures of Antarctica's Larsemann Hills

In 2003, scientists visited the Stornes Peninsula in Antarctica's Larsemann Hills to study the rocks — especially boron and phosphorus minerals. What they found set them on a decade-long path to protect the geology, culminating in 2014 with the naming of the site as an Antarctic Specially Protected Area.

19 Jan 2015

The amazing minerals of the Larsemann Hills

Four minerals were discovered on Stornes Peninsula in the Larsemann Hills of East Antarctica based on fieldwork there from 2003 to 2004. In part because of these minerals and other rare boron and phosphate minerals found in this pristine region, Stornes Peninsula is now protected as an Antarctic Specially Protected Area — the highest level of environmental protection in Antarctica. Below are some details about these special minerals.

19 Jan 2015

Mineral Resource of the Month: Antimony

Antimony is a lustrous silvery-white semimetal or metalloid. Archaeological and historical studies indicate that antimony and its mineral sulfides have been used by humans for at least six millennia. The alchemist Basil Valentine is sometimes credited with “discovering” the element; he described the extraction of metallic antimony from stibnite in his treatise “The Triumphal Chariot of Antimony,” published sometime between 1350 and 1600. In the early 18th century, Jöns Jakob Berzelius chose the periodic symbol for antimony (Sb) based on stibium, which is the Latin name for stibnite.

18 Jan 2015

Energy Notes: August 2013-2014

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

18 Jan 2015

Down to Earth With: Glaciologist Lonnie Thompson

As a child growing up in Gassaway, W.Va., Lonnie Thompson was poor. When his father died while Thompson was a senior in high school, he realized he’d need to earn a reliable paycheck as quickly as possible. As an undergraduate at Marshall University in Huntington, W.Va., he knew he wanted to study science; he started off as a physics major before settling on geology. Later, when he arrived at Ohio State University (OSU) as a graduate student in 1971, Thompson’s intent was to study coal geology, a practical choice that he believed would quickly secure him a job.

17 Jan 2015

Travels in Geology: Navigating the rocks, reefs and waters of Bermuda

Picturesque beaches, beautiful weather and a pleasant mix of Caribbean and British cultures make Bermuda a popular tourist destination, especially in the winter. But it's also a place where geology and history are on full display. 

16 Jan 2015

Getting there and getting around Bermuda

Several major airlines serve Bermuda’s L.F. Wade International Airport, located on St. David’s Island about 30 minutes from Bermuda’s capital and largest city, Hamilton. Dozens of bus routes can take passengers to almost any place on the island, but getting to and from the airport — or anywhere with large suitcases — on the bus is frowned upon. Instead, take a taxi. Rental cars are not available to visitors. The alternative is scooters, but nerves of steel and good health insurance are a must for navigating the narrow, windy, high-speed roads. And although the island is small — less than two-thirds the size of Manhattan — and many places are within walking distance, few roads outside Hamilton have sidewalks or even shoulders. A handful of ferry routes can also help you reach some destinations.

16 Jan 2015

Modeling a big mess from Yellowstone

In the event of another super-eruption at Yellowstone National Park, few places in the U.S. would be ash-free, according to a new modeling study. The northern Rocky Mountains would be blanketed in meters of ash, and millimeters would be deposited as far away as New York City, Miami and Los Angeles.

15 Jan 2015

Red Planet Roundup: January 2015

As two rovers patrol the surface of Mars, five spacecraft orbit above and scientists back here on Earth study the Red Planet from afar, new findings are announced almost weekly. Here are a few of the latest updates.

15 Jan 2015

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