Taxonomy term

october 2014

Mineral Resource of the Month: Zeolites

Zeolites comprise a group of silicate minerals with very open crystalline structures that make them suitable for catalytic, ion exchange and molecular sieving applications. Aluminum, silicon and oxygen atoms are arranged in a 3-D framework of channels and cages. Water molecules and cations, such as calcium, sodium, potassium and magnesium, occupy these interconnected channels and cages. The cations can readily substitute for one another, and water molecules may be gained or lost without any major changes to the basic zeolite crystal structure.

01 Nov 2014

Getting there and getting around Bali

Visitors to Bali arrive at the Ngurah Rai International Airport on the island’s southern side. No direct flights are available from the U.S.; most itineraries route through a major East Asian hub. To travel between Bali and the neighboring islands of Java or Lombok, you can either catch a short domestic flight (options include Garuda Indonesia and Lion Air) or take a short, though frequently rough, ferry ride.

30 Oct 2014

Down to Earth With: Molecular biologist Sarah L. Anzick

In May 1968, when Sarah L. Anzick was 2 years old, the 12,600-year-old remains of a male toddler were discovered at the base of a bluff on her family’s ranch near Wilsall, Mont. The Anzick infant — one of just a handful of ancient skeletons to have been found in North America and the only known Clovis burial site —  had been carefully buried with more than 100 stone and bone tools.

28 Oct 2014

Can renewable energy and desalination tackle two problems at once?

In an era of extended droughts combined with increasing water demand, water-scarce areas of the world are considering expensive and far-flung water sources. At the same time, electric grids are straining to meet surging demand for electricity. Could wind- and solar-powered desalination plants be the solution to both problems?

26 Oct 2014

Seasonal ice-cover reduction throughout Arctic waters mapped

Nowhere is climatic warming more evident than in the Arctic. Arctic air has warmed almost twice as much compared to the global average in recent decades, and Arctic sea-ice extent has hit historic lows in the last decade.

25 Oct 2014

Russian earthquake ruptures superfast and deep

A “superfast” magnitude-6.7 earthquake was detected off the coast of Kamchatka, Russia, in May. The earthquake, called a “supershear” quake, is one of a handful of superfast earthquakes noted by researchers over the years, but this is the first identified at such great depth.

24 Oct 2014

New lunar research answers old questions, poses others

From its close perch in the sky, the moon has long mystified artists, lovers and scientists. Now a quartet of recent papers — all of which touch on the moon’s violent birth and turbulent infancy — may help scientists put two long-standing lunar mysteries to rest, while deepening a third enigma and suggesting a speculative solution to a fourth.

23 Oct 2014

Past penguin populations not dependent on ice extent

Penguins’ lives revolve around ice, so it seems they might be particularly vulnerable to changing ice conditions and ice loss. But a new study charting the rise and fall of penguin populations over the last 30,000 years suggests that past populations have actually increased during times of climate warming and retreating ice.

21 Oct 2014

We're all living in the global aftershock zone

Can a large earthquake trigger another quake hundreds or even thousands of kilometers away? The answer, scientists say, appears to be yes, but when it happens is far from predictable. How does such dynamic triggering affect global earthquake hazards? Perhaps the whole world should be considered an aftershock zone.

19 Oct 2014

Remote triggering of ice quakes

On Feb. 27, 2010, a magnitude-8.8 earthquake struck the subduction zone off the coast of Chile. The resulting Rayleigh surface waves rippled around the world, triggering small earthquakes in many different tectonic settings, including Antarctica. As the surface waves moved across the white continent, a third of Antarctic seismic stations reported shaking coming from so-called “ice quakes.”

19 Oct 2014

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