Taxonomy term

april 2015

Small tremor could have triggered big Chilean quake

On April 1, 2014, a magnitude-8.2 earthquake shook the empty stretch of coast where Chile arcs into Peru, a region called the Iquique Gap. The gap is the only part of the 7,000 kilometer-long boundary between the Nazca and South American plates that hadn’t ruptured in the past century, despite a collision rate of almost 65 millimeters per year.

 
11 Apr 2015

Geoscience on Film: A parting ode to an awe-inspiring land

Doug Prose and his wife, Diane LaMacchia, have produced documentaries showcasing Earth and the geosciences through their nonprofit Earth Images Foundation since 1992. Currently at work on their next project, Prose is blogging for EARTH about the filmmaking process, as well as the work of the scientists they're covering, while on location in India.

10 Apr 2015

Soft-bodied fossils cast in fool's gold

Most of the fossil record is composed of hard bones and shells — only a handful of places preserve fossils of soft-bodied organisms from early in Earth’s evolutionary history. The processes by which these delicate fossils form are not well understood, but a new study looking at an assemblage of 550-million-year-old soft-bodied fossils found in China sheds light on one potential mechanism.

 
10 Apr 2015

Some coral reefs bounce back after bleaching

Ocean temperatures that rise too much or for too long can harm coral reefs, sometimes causing mass die-offs that leave reefs nearly barren of live corals. But scientists don’t know if or under what conditions reefs can recover from such catastrophes. Now, a new study suggests that, given time and the right conditions, even once-decimated reefs can recoup their losses.

09 Apr 2015

One-two punch of past warming may hold lessons

Geologists are fond of the saying, “The past is key to the future.” Unfortunately, the past has been a poor guide when it comes to understanding modern climate change. Now, however, a new study suggests that one episode — a spike in global temperatures that occurred about 55 million years ago — may be a better analog than previously thought, and could yield insights into the planet’s future.

 
09 Apr 2015

Geoscience on Film: Of tides and tigers in the world's largest river delta

Doug Prose and his wife, Diane LaMacchia, have produced documentaries showcasing Earth and the geosciences through their nonprofit Earth Images Foundation since 1992. Currently at work on their next project, Prose is blogging for EARTH about the filmmaking process, as well as the work of the scientists they're covering, while on location in India.

07 Apr 2015

Ground-shaking research: How humans trigger earthquakes

An uptick in the occurrence of earthquakes in places where they used to be rare — like Oklahoma, where waste-fluid injection is triggering frequent quakes — prompts a look at the many ways humans can and do induce seismicity.

05 Apr 2015

Methane be dammed!

Beavers were nearly killed off in the 19th century as trappers hunted them for their soft pelts. A successful conservation effort over the past 100 years brought the dam-builders back from the brink, but a new study published in the journal AMBIO has found that all those beaver-built ponds may be producing significant amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas.

 
05 Apr 2015

Coastal cities will see regular flooding

Rising sea levels will likely lead to regular flooding in most coastal cities in the future, according to a study conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The report, which used tide-gauge records to chart annual flood rates, showed that these rates have increased substantially in the past 50 years and projected that a majority of U.S. coastal areas will likely experience 30 or more days of flooding each year by 2050.

 
03 Apr 2015

Kamikaze typhoons spared Japan from Kublai Khan

Like any good conqueror, Kublai Khan just wanted to expand his empire. So in the late 13th century, the grandson of Genghis Khan launched a mythic fleet to seize control of Japan. According to Japanese legend, however, the Mongol ships met with typhoons of equally mythic proportions, which quashed their repeated invasions — twice.

01 Apr 2015

Pages