Taxonomy term

march 2018

Getting There & Getting Around Corsica

The two largest of Corsica’s four airports, Ajaccio (AJA) and Bastia (BIA), are located on the island’s southwestern and northeastern coasts, respectively. There are no direct flights from the U.S. to Corsica, so it’s usually cheapest and most convenient to fly into Paris and then catch a 1.5-hour flight to the island. Air France and Air Corsica operate connecting flights year-round from most major French cities. During the bustling summer months, other carriers, including the budget airlines EasyJet and Ryanair, offer direct service from numerous European cities. If you prefer to arrive by ferry, several lines, including Corsica Ferries and Moby Lines, offer year-round transport from Marseille, Nice and Toulon, as well as summer routes from several Italian ports.

 
09 Mar 2018

Heating up Enceladus' ice-covered ocean

Saturn’s sixth-largest moon, Enceladus, is covered by ice, but just beneath its icy surface lies an ocean of liquid water. New research suggests that this internal ocean may be maintained in a liquid state by heat generated by tidal friction within the moon’s fragmented, rocky core.

08 Mar 2018

Gettysburg rocks tell battlefield tales

Since the late 19th century, Civil War battlefield landscapes have changed. Some have been plowed under and developed, while elsewhere, woods have been cut down or become overgrown. But the rocks that dotted those battlefields from Gettysburg to Mississippi largely still stand. Historians are now using the steadfast boulders and ridges seen in the backgrounds of 154-year-old battlefield photographs to learn more about the skirmishes that took place at certain sites.

07 Mar 2018

Lakeshore shape influences lake-effect snow

On Dec. 11, 2013, Upstate New York’s Tug Hill region received more than 100 centimeters of snow in 24 hours. And annually, the region, which covers more than 5,000 square kilometers to the east of Lake Ontario, can see up to five times that amount. In comparison, Toronto, on the northwestern coast of the lake, averages less than 125 centimeters of snow each year.

06 Mar 2018

World's longest sauropod trackway exposed

Excavations at a dinosaur trackway found in 2009 in the French village of Plagne, 200 kilometers east of Lyon, revealed 110 sauropod footprints spanning a distance of 155 meters, making the site the world’s longest sauropod trackway. In a new study published in the journal Geobios, researchers report that the tracks were made roughly 150 million years ago and that the largest tracks measure more than a meter across. Analysis of the trackway suggested the prints were left by an animal at least 35 meters long and weighing more than 35 tons, that traveled about 4 kilometers per hour with an average stride of 2.8 meters. The prints were assigned to a new ichnospecies — a species only known from trace fossils — named Brontopodus plagnensis.

05 Mar 2018

Down to Earth With marine geoscientist Harold Tobin

As a boy growing up on the East Coast, Harold Tobin loved being outdoors but was not all that excited by geology or the region’s ancient rocks. But the catastrophic eruption of Washington state’s Mount St. Helens in 1980, when Tobin was 15, and the notion that tectonic plates must be moving beneath the Pacific Northwest, captured his imagination. A few years later, while a student at Yale University, he volunteered as a summer intern at Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. That experience, along with his undergraduate curriculum, convinced Tobin to become a geologist.

02 Mar 2018

Where on Earth? - March 2018

Where on Earth was this picture taken? Use these clues to guess and submit your answer via mail, email or Web by the last day of the month (March 31, 2018).

01 Mar 2018

Oldest blood cells found in Early Jurassic ichthyosaur

Since 2005, a steady trickle of reports detailing proteins and other soft tissues preserved in fossils of dinosaurs and other ancient animals has gradually worn down the disbelief that such tissues can last through geologic time. In a new study in Scientific Reports, scientists have now reported the oldest preserved red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, found in the remains of an ancient marine reptile.

01 Mar 2018

Drought drove early humans from Africa

Genetics studies have dated the largest migrations of early Homo sapiens out of Africa to between 70,000 and 55,000 years ago, although smaller groups may have left earlier. The most widely accepted exodus theory, known as the “green carpet” or “green Sahara” hypothesis, holds that people likely left during wetter periods in the Sahara and Arabia, which would have allowed easier passage into Eurasia via the Middle East. But new research supports the opposite idea: that drier conditions may have triggered at least some of the exodus.

28 Feb 2018

Creeping danger: Landslide threatens Peruvian village, especially when the earth quakes

A massive landslide has been encroaching on the village of Maca, Peru, since the 1980s. Today, it provides geologists with a laboratory to study slow-moving landslides, especially how they react to rainfall and earthquakes.
27 Feb 2018

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