Taxonomy term

june 2014

Travels in Geology: Croatia: Land of limestone

The nearly ubiquitous limestone bedrock of Croatia, where karst topography was first described, produces a majestic and unforgettable landscape. Visitors can cirumnavigate the fortified walls of Dubrovnik, one of Europe's best-preserved medieval cities, lounge on a white cobble beach by the azure  Adriatic Sea, or hike past the aquamarine pools and countless waterfalls of Plitvice Lakes, the country's largest national park. 

20 Jun 2014

Getting there and getting around Croatia

Although there are no direct flights between the U.S. and Croatia, the capital, Zagreb, is connected year-round to most major European cities, and the Dalmatian Coast airports of Split and Dubrovnik are well connected during the summer. All three offer numerous car rental options; an online consolidator such as Auto Europe can help you efficiently find the best price. One-way rentals are generally only available to other locations in Croatia and Slovenia.
 

20 Jun 2014

Spanish cave reveals possible new Neanderthal ancestor

A trove of thousands of hominin fossils unearthed from a prolific cave in northern Spain is proving a boon for paleoanthropologists studying human evolution and the early ancestors of Neanderthals. The fossils are proving difficult to categorize as a recognized species, however, raising the prospect of a new category of hominin for these Middle Pleistocene specimens.

19 Jun 2014

New burgess shale fossil site found in Canada's Kootenay National Park

With its plethora of ancient and exquisitely preserved soft-bodied fossils, the Burgess Shale in Canada’s Yoho National Park is one of the world’s most famous fossil sites. Now a sister site has been discovered just 40 kilometers away in Kootenay National Park, and the new find may prove even richer than the original.
 

18 Jun 2014

Geomedia: Books: Science in fiction

As a science magazine, EARTH usually reviews nonfiction. This month, however, we are bringing you reviews of three recent novels with scientific themes that might make nice additions to your summer reading list. The three novels fall neatly into classic genres — the murder mystery, the high-stakes thriller and the science-infused fantasy — so hopefully there is a little something for everyone. Warning: spoilers follow.
 

17 Jun 2014

Getting there and getting around Tajikistan

Tajikistan is not exactly a hotbed of tourism, but for adventurous geo-travelers, especially those with an interest in dynamic landscapes, Tajikistan offers amazing mountain and glacier climbing, endless backpacking possibilities, and the experience of feeling like you have traveled back in time.
 

16 Jun 2014

Benchmarks: June 16, 1963 & June 18, 1983: Valentina Tereshkova and Sally Ride become first and third women in space

On June 16, 1963, during the height of the Cold War, Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman to fly in space. It would be 19 years before another woman would fly in space — Soviet Svetlana Savitskaya in 1982 — and 20 years before the first American woman, Sally Ride, made it into space on June 18, 1983. These pioneers inspired the generations of women astronauts who followed. In the three decades since Ride’s foray into outer space, 57 other women have also taken flight (see sidebar) and, last year, half of NASA’s new class of astronauts were women.

16 Jun 2014

By the numbers: Women in space

The first two women in space — Valentina Tereshkova and Svetlana Savitskaya — were from the Soviet Union. Since their pioneering space flights, 58 other women have also flown in space.

16 Jun 2014

Travels in Geology: Trekking the high terrain of Tajikistan

Tajikistan is not exactly a hotbed of tourism, but for adventurous geo-travelers, especially those with an interest in dynamic landscapes, Tajikistan offers amazing mountain and glacier climbing, endless backpacking possibilities, and the experience of feeling like you have traveled back in time.

13 Jun 2014

Subarctic lakes belch more methane on brighter days

Each summer, frozen ground in Arctic and subarctic regions, called permafrost, thaws and releases accumulated methane. For years, scientists have searched for a clear-cut way to estimate the amount of this potent greenhouse gas that these areas contribute to the atmosphere and the changing climate. Now, they have come one step closer to solving part of the problem.

12 Jun 2014

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