Taxonomy term

april 2010

Paleo Patrol: A hominin family reunion at the Smithsonian

Last month, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., unveiled its new (permanent) human evolution exhibit: the David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins. The exhibit seeks to answer the millennia-old question, What does it mean to be human?

29 Apr 2010

Where on Earth? - April 2010

Clues for April 2010:
1. Formed from limestone during the Mesozoic era, one of the massive round formations in this karst landscape displays a 120-meter-high mural.
2. Traditional methods of farming, such as for tobacco, are still practiced in this valley, which covers some 132 square kilometers.
3. Home to a number of rare species, this valley also hosts the world’s smallest living bird.
Name this valley and its location.
Scroll down for the answer

Hazardous Living: Good reading - is the apocalypse upon us?

Earthquakes, volcanoes and blizzards, oh my. Is this year anomalous? Has Mother Nature turned on us and decided to shake up the planet? Are we headed toward an apocalypse?

21 Apr 2010

Offbeat Betting: Volcano betting gathering steam

You never quite know when a given volcano is going to erupt — but you can bet on it. Ireland’s biggest bookmaker, Paddy Power, jetted to fame among geologists in early January, when it announced its latest novelty bet: which of a handful of famous volcanoes around the world would be the next to powerfully erupt.

21 Apr 2010

Blogging on EARTH linkfest: More on the Iceland eruption

Blogging on EARTH: Iceland links and Volcanoes 301

There's a lot of great info out there about the Iceland eruption's geology, if you know where to link.

19 Apr 2010

Comment: Peak Soil: Does civilization have a future?

First there was Peak Oil, the idea that there’s only so much oil out there and we may have reached or even passed a turning point in global oil production. In his 2007 book “Peak Everything,” author Richard Heinberg said it’s not just fossil fuels: Everything from population to food production to freshwater availability has its own point of no return.

15 Apr 2010

Tracking volcanic ash: Helping airplanes avoid catastrophe

For more than 9,000 years, Chaitén volcano quietly towered 1,122 meters over southern Chile. The volcano seemed almost asleep: Its wide crater, shaped by layers of ash and pumice from an ancient eruption, held two lakes and a giant dome of obsidian — the same glossy black rock that was used in prehistoric times to shape artifacts found at archaeological sites as far as 400 kilometers away. Almost at the foot of the volcano, just 10 kilometers to the southwest, a small village grew into the town of Chaitén, population 4,200.

15 Apr 2010

China quake kills at least 400


In 2008, it was the Longmen Shan Fault, a 250-kilometer long thrust fault that divides the 6,500-meter-high Tibetan Plateau from the lower Sichuan basin, which ruptured. However, today's series of quakes occurred several hundred kilometers to the northwest, in the eastern Tibetan Plateau, and were the result of strike-slip faulting, according to USGS.

14 Apr 2010

Large earthquake rattles Baja California

A magnitude-7.2 earthquake struck northern Baja California, Mexico, at about 3:40 p.m. local time Sunday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. At least two people were killed, several hundred were injured and thousands were without power as a result of the quake. Aftershocks as high as magnitude 5.0 have continued to rattle the region today.

05 Apr 2010

Travels in Geology: Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro: From parasitic cones to equatorial glaciers

Tanzania’s Mount Kilimanjaro is the world’s tallest mountain that climbers can reach without technical means. The author decided to try it for herself, and brought back a lifetime of memories and dozens of photos of parasitic cones, equatorial glaciers, lava outcrops, volcanic vents and scenery to die for.

02 Apr 2010