Taxonomy term

march 2013

Big quakes topple traditional views of fault behavior

If rules are made to be broken, then perhaps conventional wisdom is made to be overturned. The spate of large earthquakes in recent years — the magnitude and location of which have defied scientific expectations in several cases — has provided ample support for these maxims, at least within earth science. For all the confusion, though, data emerging from these events are reshaping and improving our understanding of how faults operate.

14 Apr 2013

Widely used index may have overestimated drought

The severity and frequency of drought are expected to increase worldwide as climate change leads to a warmer atmosphere and regional changes in precipitation, and some research has shown that drought is already increasing. But a new study concludes that the increase in drought claimed by previous studies has been overestimated and that there has actually been little increase over the last 60 years.

07 Apr 2013

Community college at sea: Research experiences for community college students build the STEM pipeline

It’s 3 a.m., and students from two Oregon community colleges are rocking back and forth through roiling seas. Their objective is to recover an ocean-bottom seismometer that has been lying 160 meters underwater off the west coast of Vancouver Island, where it has been steadily recording seismic signals and long-period pressure trends for the past year. These students are experiencing what earth scientists do for a living, as a part of the Cascadia Initiative’s CC@Sea program.

31 Mar 2013

Spotlight on UCORE projects

The National Science Foundation-funded Undergraduate Catalytic Outreach and Research Experience (UCORE) program ran from 2007 to 2012 and involved 132 students from six different community colleges in Oregon. During the five years of the UCORE program, groups of three to six community college students from each campus spent 10 weeks in the summer on the University of Oregon campus, working on projects alongside graduate students and faculty in chemistry, geological sciences and physics research groups. Listed below are some of the projects in which the students were involved.

31 Mar 2013

Getting There And Getting Around Arizona

The natural beauty of Havasu Canyon is well worth the effort it takes to get there. A limited number of people may visit at one time, so reservations are required and openings are often fully booked months in advance, especially during the Spring Break season.

 
30 Mar 2013

The River Runners' Route

Havasu’s magnificent waterfalls are also accessible to Grand Canyon river runners, and a stop to experience Havasu Creek’s magical turquoise water is almost mandatory on any Colorado River rafting trip. 

 
30 Mar 2013

Travels in Geology: Havasu Canyon: Land of blue-green water

For Northern Arizona’s Havasupai tribe, whose name means “People of the Blue-Green Water,” a deep connection with the land has been the culture’s cornerstone for hundreds of years. It is easy to see why when you journey to their magnificent homeland below the Grand Canyon’s rim. There you are treated to all the majestic grandeur you expect in the Grand Canyon, plus a robust stream with the most vibrantly turquoise water this side of the tropics. The stream — Havasu Creek — rushes from one deep emerald pool to the next over a series of small travertine dams and plunges over five spectacular waterfalls as it tumbles pell-mell toward the Colorado River. The shape of each waterfall is slowly modified by the addition of new travertine rock that precipitates out of the very water that tumbles over its lip. More dramatic resculpting is done by the frequent flash floods that roar down Havasu Creek, most recently in 2008.

30 Mar 2013

Apollo science, 40 years later: Scientists reopen a lunar cold case

Today’s lunar scientists are like detectives who reopen old criminal cases and examine them anew with modern instruments and techniques like DNA analysis. Armed with data and analytical techniques not available in the 1970s, scientists are re-examining Apollo moon rocks and learning more than ever before about our nearest celestial neighbor.

24 Mar 2013

Energy Notes: November 2011-2012

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org

 
19 Mar 2013

Down to Earth With: Adrian Hunt

Adrian Hunt grew up in England, but after earning his undergraduate degree in geology at the University of Manchester, he began looking for somewhere foreign to attend graduate school. At the time, Hunt says, he thought, “If it doesn’t work out, at least I’d see somewhere exotic.” He ended up in New Mexico, where his brother was working at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory’s Very Large Array in Socorro. It worked out and Hunt stayed to complete a master’s degree at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, followed by a doctorate at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque.

18 Mar 2013

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