Taxonomy term

nevada

Travels in Geology: Las Vegas: The scenery beyond the slots

Beyond the Strip lie southern Nevada’s craggy limestone peaks, colorful sandstone canyons, and enormous conservation areas that, despite the searing desert heat, harbor a tremendous diversity of plants and wildlife. From soaring summits and graceful bighorn sheep to prehistoric petroglyphs, this desert oasis has a lot to offer the geo-minded traveler.
14 Feb 2018

Getting There and Getting Around Las Vegas

McCarran International Airport is the main gateway for exploring Las Vegas and the surrounding area. Except for sights along the Strip, it’s necessary to rent a car to see the attractions described here. If you fly in, you can rent a vehicle at the airport or take a shuttle or taxi into the city and rent a car as needed. Although all of these sites are open year-round, the best times of year to visit are in the spring and fall. In winter, it’s not possible to hike high in the Spring Mountains due to snow, and in summer the valley heat can be stifling. There are currently no visitor facilities or infrastructure at Tule Springs National Monument, but you can catch a glimpse of the fossil beds near one of two National Park Service signs, one located at the intersection of Moccasin Road and Durango Drive, and the other where North Decatur Boulevard meets Horse Drive.

14 Feb 2018

Beavers preserve wetlands in water-stressed areas

Once considered detrimental to ecosystems and nuisances where, for example, dams flooded farmland, beavers have been rhetorically touted in recent years as a potential boon for wetland health and water conservation. Anecdotal accounts and qualitative findings have suggested beavers improve water quality and availability in drought-stressed ecosystems, but just how much influence they have was not known. In new research, scientists have examined two creeks in Nevada to directly measure how effective beaver dams are at slowing water flows and storing water through the dry summer months.

30 Jan 2018

Firefighting gets a leg up from earthquake sensor networks

Seismic networks monitor ground motion in earthquake-prone regions like California and Nevada. Now, they may also help combat other natural hazards like wildfires, which are especially common in drought-stricken western states where parched landscapes create ideal conditions for fires to spread.

19 Aug 2016

Asbestos found in Nevada and Arizona: Roadblock and potential health hazard?

The discovery of a previously unknown type of asbestos-forming geologic environment means asbestos may be more widespread than thought. But is it a health hazard?

29 Jan 2015