Taxonomy term

fieldwork

Fieldwork among the pixels: Virtual and augmented reality diversify geoscience education

Students going out into the field to gain hands-on experience and mapping skills is a time-honored tradition in geology. Now, teachers are using virtual and augmented reality technology to bring the field to the students.
23 May 2018

Down to Earth With: Paleoclimatologist Gifford H. Miller

“Hope for the unexpected.” This motto has pulled paleoclimatologist Gifford H. Miller to remote corners of the world to conduct fieldwork for more than half a century. Miller, a professor of geological sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU) and associate director of the Institute for Arctic and Alpine Research, thrives on the pursuit of knowledge, asking tough questions about the global climate system whose answers have far-reaching implications. But it’s the thrill of unexpected discoveries — of which he’s made many — that keep him returning for more. His discoveries, including the extinction timing of giant birds in Australia, the existence of “zombie mosses” that document the life-cycle of Arctic ice caps, and the finding of lake sediments that tell the story of Iceland’s deglaciation, have led to advances in our understanding of Earth’s climate history and the role humans have played in it.

30 Jun 2017

Geologic Column: Field Sketches

An art exhibit prompted the author to reflect on fieldwork, his library of field notebooks and how geolgists can integrate digital technology into field geology courses.
29 Jul 2015

Geocorps America: Putting geoscientists to work on federal lands

GeoCorps America has been putting geoscience students, recent graduates, and professional and retired geoscientists to work on short-term projects on federal lands since 1997. Today, GeoCorps encompasses projects in more than 60 national parks, 15 national forests and 15 public lands; and it is still growing.

18 Dec 2014

Valley Fever an occupational hazard for geoscientists

Geoscientists should take precautions against contracting Valley Fever — a sometimes-fatal infection with no known cure and no vaccine that is caused by a soilborne fungus, said James A. Jacobs, a California-based consulting hydrogeologist, at the annual meeting of the American Institute of Professional Geologists last year.
 

07 Sep 2014

Valley fever's deadly history

The earliest recorded case of coccidioidomycosis was documented in Argentina in 1892, when a soldier was diagnosed with what was first thought to be an infection of coccidia — parasitic protozoans, like cryptosporidium and toxoplasma, that infect the intestines of animals, including chickens, cows, dogs and cats. The soldier lived with the disease for 11 years, during which time his doctors realized it was not caused by a protozoa but by a fungus. The name, however, stuck.
 

07 Sep 2014

Geologic Column: Lessons from the final frontier

Somewhere, out there, beyond the stars Arcturus and Pollux, the TV signals from the final season of the original “Star Trek” are radiating outward. The series has been a teaching tool for a generation, and the programs offer multiple lessons for earth scientists.

03 Feb 2012