Taxonomy term


Meteorites did not spark Ordovician biodiversification

During the Ordovician Period, roughly 470 million years ago, an asteroid the size of a small moon collided with another rocky object in the belt between Mars and Jupiter, shattering the asteroid into billions of pieces. Fragments from the epic collision still occasionally fall to Earth today, making up a large share of the meteorites recovered. But in the immediate wake of the Ordovician event, many pieces rained down on the planet, settling on the surface and in layers of rock forming at the time. In a new study, researchers studying some of these meteorite-rich layers have refined the timescale for the collision. The results bring into question a proposed link between the meteorite bombardment and an evolutionary uptick known as the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE).

23 May 2017

New type of meteorite found in Sweden

Meteorites offer a glimpse into the workings and origins of our solar system. Now, a meteorite found in a Swedish quarry, reported in a new study in Nature Communications, is opening a whole new window: The find has been classified as a new type of meteorite, never before seen on Earth.

18 Oct 2016

Travels in Geology: Gotland getaway: Sweden's 'tropical' escape in the Baltic

Gotland, a Silurian-aged coral-reef island with white sand beaches, lies not in the tropics but in the Baltic Sea off the southeastern coast of Sweden just a short trip from Stockholm. In addition to the carbonate geology, visitors can view medieval churches and thatched-roof Viking farms, and experience the moody, atmospheric weather featured in the films of director Ingmar Bergman.

21 Mar 2016