Taxonomy term

epidemic

Valley Fever an occupational hazard for geoscientists

Geoscientists should take precautions against contracting Valley Fever — a sometimes-fatal infection with no known cure and no vaccine that is caused by a soilborne fungus, said James A. Jacobs, a California-based consulting hydrogeologist, at the annual meeting of the American Institute of Professional Geologists last year.
 

07 Sep 2014

Valley fever's deadly history

The earliest recorded case of coccidioidomycosis was documented in Argentina in 1892, when a soldier was diagnosed with what was first thought to be an infection of coccidia — parasitic protozoans, like cryptosporidium and toxoplasma, that infect the intestines of animals, including chickens, cows, dogs and cats. The soldier lived with the disease for 11 years, during which time his doctors realized it was not caused by a protozoa but by a fungus. The name, however, stuck.
 

07 Sep 2014

Extinction-era coal linked to Chinese cancer epidemic

At the close of the Permian, 252 million years ago, conditions on Earth took a turn for the worse, nearly wiping out life on land and at sea in the planet’s most severe extinction event. Now, eons later, geologists are implicating a coal seam that dates to the “Great Dying” at the Permian-Triassic boundary in one of the modern world’s worst cancer epidemics.

14 Jan 2010