Taxonomy term

field trip

Down to Earth With: Paleontologist Lisa D. White

As a college student at San Francisco State University, Lisa D. White’s first choice of major was photography. She was drawn to landscapes, and dreamed of becoming “the black female Ansel Adams,” she tells me, surrounded by fossils. We’re in a lab at the University of California Museum of Paleontology (UCMP) in Berkeley, where she is assistant director of Education and Public Programs. She is also a micropaleontologist, and from 1990 until joining UCMP in 2012, she was professor of geology and later associate dean at San Francisco State University.

01 Sep 2017

Teaching geology to biologists: An essay on an interdisciplinary field trip in Africa

On a trip to Tanzania, the author tries to impart to undergrads an understanding of the relationships among geology, ecology and culture that will enhance the students’ knowledge of the landscape — a challenge made difficult by the dramedy of life on the savanna. 
10 Aug 2016

Geology for everyone: Making the field accessible

Many students with sensory, physical or cognitive disabilities are potentially discouraged from pursuing geoscience degrees when faced with physically rigorous field-based learning environments, but with planning, field geology can be accessible for all.

16 Aug 2015

The Coconino's starring role in the creationist-geologist battle

Arizona’s Coconino Sandstone — a deposit seen in the Grand Canyon and elsewhere — plays a central role in the creationist argument that the upper rocks of the Grand Canyon were deposited during Noah’s Flood. In fact, the posters presented by students and faculty of Cedarville University at the 2010 annual meeting of the Geological Society of America (GSA) in Denver, Colo., pushed a consistent narrative: The Coconino did not form in an eolian (wind-blown) environment. Why is this so important? If the Coconino is eolian, it means the Flood did not happen.

10 Jun 2011

Creationism creeps into mainstream geology

It was easy to miss the part where the field trip leader said the outcrop formed during Noah’s Flood. After all, “During these catastrophic flood flows, turbulent, hyperconcentrated suspensions were observed to transform laminar mudflows” sounds like a reasonable description of alluvial fan processes. And “massive marine transgression” sounds scientific enough. But when creationist geologists use those phrases, they take on a very different meaning.

10 Jun 2011