Taxonomy term

geology

Down to Earth With: Volcanologist Thorvaldur Thordarson

Despite growing up in Iceland, with Earth’s most volcanically active landscape as his playground, Thorvaldur Thordarson had no idea he would grow up to be a volcanologist. Nor did he suspect that his career path would take him all over the world to witness eruptions and aftermaths on six continents.

19 Oct 2018

Sipping carbon-neutral fuel from the atmosphere

In the near future, vehicles may be powered by carbon that comes from the sky, rather than out of the ground. Direct Air Capture (DAC) technology pulls carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and converts the carbon into pellets that can be used to make hydrocarbon fuel that works in traditional engines. A new study details the process, which has been tested over the last three years, and offers some cost-saving solutions that make DAC more economically feasible than ever.

16 Oct 2018

Dutch Masters: The Netherlands exports flood-control expertise

Since the 13th century, the low-lying Netherlands has been developing innovative water management techniques and technologies, including recent projects like the Delta Works, the Zandmotor and Room for the River. Now, facing global sea-level rise, flood-prone coastal cities in the U.S., like New Orleans and New York, and elsewhere around the world, are calling on the Dutch to teach them how to hold back the sea. 
15 Oct 2018

Surfactants slow oceanic carbon dioxide uptake

The oceans are the largest long-term carbon sink on Earth, absorbing about a quarter of all anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. The rate of exchange of carbon dioxide between the oceans and the atmosphere is thought to be primarily controlled by wind-driven turbulence at the sea surface. More turbulence leads to increasing gas exchange and higher rates of carbon uptake by the ocean. 

12 Oct 2018

Benchmarks: October 11, 1899: Second Boer War begins, fueled by discovery of gold

The 1886 discovery of gold on a farm in the Witwatersrand region of southern Africa drove the growth of Johannesburg, and gold mining has aided the South African economy for more than a century since. But gold, and diamonds, also fueled the Second Boer War, one of the most destructive armed conflicts in Africa’s history. The war resulted in the deaths of nearly 100,000 people, including tens of thousands of Boer women and children who died in British concentration camps. The consequences of the war, including gold mining’s lasting environmental legacy, and the rise of Afrikaner nationalism that reinforced apartheid, are still felt today.

11 Oct 2018

Travels in Geology: Roof of the Rockies: Trail Ridge Road

Often dubbed the Highway to the Sky, 3,713-meter-high Trail Ridge Road is the signature scenic drive and sole route across Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Park. The winding ribbon of hairpin bends offers numerous vistas of soaring, snow-capped peaks, alpine tundra, abundant wildlife, and the colorful carpets of tiny wildflowers it hosts for a few weeks each summer after its dramatic opening.
04 Oct 2018

Getting There And Getting Around Rocky Mountain National Park

Denver International Airport (DEN) is the best arrival point for exploring Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), and a car is the most convenient way to see Trail Ridge Road and the park’s many other attractions. If you fly in, you can rent a vehicle at the airport and drive to Estes Park, the eastern gateway town, which is roughly 1.5 hours from the airport, or to Grand Lake at the west end of Trail Ridge, about a three-hour drive.

04 Oct 2018

Methane emissions offset some blue carbon burial benefits

Wetlands are prolific sinks for atmospheric carbon. They pull carbon dioxide out of the air and sequester the carbon in plants, soils and sediments. But there’s a catch: Wetlands also emit methane, an even more potent, albeit far less abundant, greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. Two new studies, one measuring methane emissions from a rehabilitated freshwater peatland in California and the other looking at emissions from tropical mangrove forests in Australia, are revealing that these so-called “blue carbon” sinks may emit much more methane than previously thought.

03 Oct 2018

Dry rivers secretly star in carbon cycle

In arid environments, some seasonal rivers and streams spend more time as dry riverbeds than they do as flowing waterways. A new study is giving scientists a clearer understanding of how these intermittently dry streambeds contribute to the global carbon cycle.

02 Oct 2018

Comment: Why is it so hard to teach climate change?

Someday, today’s young people may amass enough momentum to take action on climate change, but will they have the knowledge to do so?
01 Oct 2018

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