Taxonomy term

timothy oleson

Earth-like atmosphere enough to set some exoplanets spinning

Earth is “Exhibit A” in showing that planetary rotation — which moderates global climate, keeps a lot of water in liquid form and generally makes the place more livable — is a plus when it comes to sustaining life. But scientists have thought that many of the rocky, Earth-like exoplanets discovered recently, which might otherwise be considered potentially hospitable to life, aren’t so fortunate. On these unlucky worlds, unable to rotate because they’re held too tightly by their parent stars’ gravity, one half of the planet is perpetually roasted by stellar radiation while the other is left frigid and dark. Now, however, a new study suggests that a little atmosphere can go a long way toward helping exoplanets rotate.
 

22 Aug 2015

Ice (Re) Cap: August 2015

From Antarctica to the Arctic; from polar caps, permafrost and glaciers to ocean-rafted sea ice; and from burly bears to cold-loving microbes, fascinating science is found in every nook and crevasse of Earth’s cryosphere, and new findings are announced often. Here are a few of the latest updates.
 
15 Aug 2015

Red Planet Roundup: July 2015

With two rovers patrolling the surface of Mars, five spacecraft in orbit above it, and scientists here on Earth studying the Red Planet from afar, new findings are announced often. Here are a few of the latest updates.
 
15 Jul 2015

Bare Earth Elements: "Volcano of Fire" eruption forces evacuations in Mexico

Mexico’s civil protection agency, along with local officials, issued an emergency declaration Saturday for the area surrounding Colima Volcano, after the eruption that began on Thursday intensified into the weekend. The eruption is said to have sent towering clouds of ash upwards of 4 kilometers into the sky, while lava and pyroclastic flows have spewed down the flanks of the volcano also known as Volcán de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire — one of Mexico’s most active.

13 Jul 2015

Sediment load shapes rivers

The amount of sediment carried in meandering rivers influences how quickly the bends in those rivers migrate back and forth, according to recent research in Nature Geoscience addressing a longstanding question regarding river evolution. Meanders form when flowing water erodes one riverbank while simultaneously depositing sediment on the opposite bank, gradually creating more and more pronounced U-shaped bends. Sometimes, the rivers cut new channels across the narrow necks of such bends, isolating the abandoned meanders to form distinctive oxbow lakes. 
 
04 Jul 2015

Ice (Re) Cap: June 2015

From Antarctica to the Arctic; from polar caps, permafrost and glaciers to ocean-rafted sea ice; and from burly bears to cold-loving microbes, fascinating science is found in every nook and crevasse of Earth’s cryosphere, and new findings are announced often. Here are a few of the latest updates.
 
14 Jun 2015

Red Planet Roundup: May 2015

With two rovers patrolling the surface of Mars, five spacecraft in orbit above it, and scientists back here on Earth studying the Red Planet from afar, new findings are announced almost weekly. Here are a few of the latest updates.

15 May 2015

Beyond the bomb: The world's nuclear watchdog expands its science

The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization uses a vast array of scientific instruments deployed around the world to detect evidence of rogue nuclear weapons tests. Now, they're using the collected data for other types of science as well.

27 Apr 2015

On-site inspections

In the event that the CTBT enters into force, a third element of the CTBTO's verification regime — in addition to the IMS and IDC — would come into play: on-site inspections (OSI). Given potential evidence of a nuclear test, member states can call for an inspection of the suspected area as a final verification measure.

 
27 Apr 2015

Down the Earth With: Clive Oppenheimer

North Korea is perhaps the most isolated country in the world, with a people, culture and landscape largely veiled from outside observation, which rarely hosts few Westerners. However, in recent years a smattering of western scientists have visited the country, including volcanologist Clive Oppenheimer from the University of Cambridge in England. In 2011, Oppenheimer was invited by North Korean scientists who were concerned about a sleeping giant of a volcano on the northern border with China that had shown signs of restlessness. A few weeks later, he found himself on the imposing but beautiful mountain, known as Paektu-san to the Koreans (or Changbaishan in China), with a small team trying to unravel the volcano’s past and potential future activity. He has returned to North Korea twice since, and is looking to extend the rare collaboration further.

17 Apr 2015

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