Taxonomy term

terri cook

Down to Earth With: GEO Secretariat Director Barbara Ryan

When Barbara Ryan enrolled as a freshman at the State University of New York in Cortland, she enjoyed athletics so much that she planned to pursue a career in physical education and coaching. Then her roommate convinced her to take a class in paleontology. She was hooked, and within months Ryan changed her major to geology, launching herself down an entirely different path. 
 
18 Dec 2015

Travels in Geology: Sedona: A journey to the edge of a supercontinent

Built upon crimson slopes studded with junipers and towering pines, surrounded by soaring red rock spires, and encircled by 800,000 hectares of pristine national forest, the central Arizona town of Sedona is widely recognized for its natural beauty, diverse recreational opportunities, flourishing art scene and its role as a hub of New Age healing.

01 Dec 2015

Getting there and getting around Sedona

Although Flagstaff’s Pulliam Airport is located just 40 kilometers from Sedona, flights into Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, a two-hour drive to the south, are usually cheaper and have better connections. It is also possible to ride Amtrak’s Southwest Chief route to Flagstaff. To fully explore central Arizona, you will need a car; if you fly in, you can rent one at either city’s airport, in downtown Flagstaff or in Sedona. 
 
01 Dec 2015

Wormholes may limit landslides

When Emma Harrison, a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania, began digging trenches in the Luquillos Mountains of Puerto Rico to study how the soil mantle responds to rapid changes in erosion, she couldn’t help but notice that the thick soils were chock-full of wriggling worms. Intrigued by the worms’ abundance and prodigious activity at her field site, Harrison wondered whether their presence could be influencing weathering and erosion in the Luquillos. 

09 Nov 2015

Getting there and getting around Cyprus

Cyprus has been populated for centuries by a mix of ethnic Greeks and Turks. Periodic ethnic tensions erupted into communal violence in 1963, leading to a Turkish invasion in 1974. Turkey has controlled the northern third of the island ever since. The Troödos Mountains, which host the ophiolitic rocks, rise in the center of the island, within the Republic of Cyprus.
 
04 Nov 2015

Travels in Geology: Cyprus: Island of Oceanic Crust

The soul of Cyprus, the third-largest island in the Mediterranean, lies in the Troödos Mountains — a rare, intact sliver of ancient oceanic crust that played a pivotal role in the development of plate tectonic theory. But don’t miss the Neolithic, Roman and Byzantine ruins, or the stunning beaches.

04 Nov 2015

Northern Cyprus' "Peace Water" Pipeline

With its semi-arid climate and growing population, Cyprus suffers from the highest level of water stress in Europe and is ranked in the top five most water-stressed countries in the world, according to the World Resources Institute. Demand in the larger southern Republic of Cyprus is predicted to increase to 314 million cubic meters per year by 2020, up from 266 million cubic meters in 2004.
04 Nov 2015

Travels in Geology: Australia's Whitsunday Islands: Sun, sand and silicic volcanism

Swimming and snorkeling near the Great Barrier Reef, hiking and ziplining through rainforests and waterfalls, and relaxing on a beach composed of 99 percent pure quartz sand can all be done in a couple days’ trip to the Whitsunday Islands and Queensland, Australia.

01 Sep 2015

Getting there and getting around the Whitsundays

The gateway airports to the Whitsundays are on Hamilton Island and near Proserpine on the mainland. Neither hosts direct flights from the U.S., but both connect to Sydney and Brisbane, Australia’s primary international arrival points, as well as Cairns, the most popular access point to the Great Barrier Reef. From Proserpine, Whitsunday Transit can transport you to accommodations throughout the region.
 
01 Sep 2015

Down to Earth With: Engineer Jeffrey Bielicki

With degrees in mechanical engineering, business administration and public administration from a variety of prestigious universities, one might get the impression that Jeffrey Bielicki is an inveterate academic with his head buried in books. And, indeed, Bielicki has spent most of his career in research, looking into solutions for problems in engineering, energy and policy. But far from narrowing his focus, Bielicki’s schooling in multiple disciplines has given him the desire and ability to see issues from a range of perspectives, thus informing and broadening his approaches to solving them. 
 
20 Aug 2015

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