Taxonomy term

sara e. pratt

Oldest-known skeletal animals found

The Ediacaran Period, which lasted from 635 million to 541 million years ago, is famous for the evolution of soft-bodied organisms that pre-dated the Cambrian Explosion, the relatively brief period during which most of the major animal phyla appeared. Now, Ediacaran-aged animals with skeletons have been found.

29 Dec 2014

Antibacterial clays could fight superbugs

Clays with antibacterial properties found near Crater Lake in Oregon could eventually lead to new agents in the fight against antibiotic-resistant superbugs like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA, according to a new study.

28 Dec 2014

Snow triggers quakes on Mount Rainier

A new study indicates that more than 150,000 low-frequency earthquakes that occurred on Mount Rainier over the past decade were caused by snowfall that triggered stick-slip sliding of glaciers.

25 Dec 2014

Ancient storms recorded in Yucatán cave

Today, one can find a plethora of records about coastal storms — everything from local news footage of wading meteorologists to the moment-to-moment wind speeds and barometric pressures of entire seasons of Atlantic hurricanes recorded in NOAA databases. Ancient storms are harder to track, unless they left a mark in the geologic record. Now, researchers have a new proxy record, one of the longest to date, to study ancient storms.

23 Dec 2014

Oceans: Where has all the plastic gone?

Plastic in the ocean is a growing concern, yet no one knows for sure how much debris is out there, where it is and how it affects marine ecosystems and food chains. Andrés Cózar of the University of Cádiz in Puerto Real, Spain, and colleagues recently undertook a meta-study to estimate the abundance and distribution of plastic in the global ocean.

21 Dec 2014

Mineral in Chelyabinsk meteorite reveals past collision

A new analysis of fragments of the Chelyabinsk meteorite — which burst over Chelyabinsk, Russia, in February 2013 — reveals that its parent asteroid collided with another asteroid nearly 300 million years before it struck Earth.

20 Dec 2014

Geocorps America: Putting geoscientists to work on federal lands

GeoCorps America has been putting geoscience students, recent graduates, and professional and retired geoscientists to work on short-term projects on federal lands since 1997. Today, GeoCorps encompasses projects in more than 60 national parks, 15 national forests and 15 public lands; and it is still growing.

18 Dec 2014

Into the parks: A sampling of GeoCorps projects

Applications are now being accepted for spring and summer 2015 GeoCorps America positions. The deadline is Feb. 3 at noon (Mountain Time). Fall and winter positions will be posted on May 1, with an application deadline of noon on July 1. Applicants may apply for up to three positions (although they can only accept one) and must be a member of the Geological Society of America to apply. Below is a sampling of some GeoCorps projects.

18 Dec 2014

Try and try again: GeoCorps application tips

The competition for GeoCorps America positions has been getting stiffer each year as the number of applicants increases. Last year, the program received more than 1,400 applications for 136 summer positions.

18 Dec 2014

Minor miners: A brief reflection on child labor underground

It has been more than a century since one of the first child labor laws in the U.S. raised the minimum age of mineworkers to 12, but some mines in Colorado are still encouraging children to descend into the bowels of the Earth — as tourists now, of course.

03 Dec 2014

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