Taxonomy term

june 2017

Northeast and Midwest U.S. projected to warm faster than national average

The U.S. Northeast and Midwest will warm quickly in the coming decades compared to national and global averages, reaching established temperature benchmarks sooner than most of the rest of the country, and the world, according to recent research published in PLOS ONE.

16 Jun 2017

Whirling "gravel devils" show wind can carry more than just sand

Sand grains, by definition, are between 0.06 and 2 millimeters in diameter, and they are often thought of by scientists as the largest sediments that wind can transport, with larger sediments simply being too hefty for winds to keep aloft. But strong winds, particularly in tropical storms and tornadoes, are known to move objects far larger than sand over short distances. Now, in the high Andes of Chile on the Salar Gorbea salt flat, evidence has been found of tornadic “gravel devils” whipping across the landscape and transporting gypsum crystals as long as 27 centimeters.

16 Jun 2017

"The Himalaya Connection": Telling a story of geoscientific exploration on film

A filmmaker describes the triumphs and travails of six trips to Asia to capture footage and interviews for a forthcoming PBS documentary about the Himalayas and the earth scientists who are working to protect the region’s inhabitants from natural hazards. |
14 Jun 2017

Travels in Geology: Tracking African animals and deranged drainages across the Kalahari

The Okavango Delta, a major river delta in the middle of the dry Kalahari, and thundering Victoria Falls, a day’s drive away, may seem unrelated. But to a geologist, they are inextricably linked by hydrologic changes that have swept across southern Africa in response to subtle tectonic movements and major Pleistocene climate fluctuations.
12 Jun 2017

Getting there and getting around Kalahari

There are three gateway cities to the Kalahari, all of which are at least a day’s drive from the Okavango Delta. Although it’s the farthest (about 12 hours away), the O.R. Tambo International Airport (JNB) in Johannesburg, South Africa, is the region’s largest and often has the best airfares and car-rental rates. Two closer alternatives, each about an eight-hour drive away, are Botswana’s Sir Seretse Khama International Airport (GBE) in Gaborone and Namibia’s Hosea Kutako International Airport (WDH) in Windhoek. Maun (MUB) is Botswana’s primary tourist hub and the delta’s main service town. Most accommodations there provide a free minibus transfer from the airport.

12 Jun 2017

Ceres' homemade organic materials

Researchers analyzing data from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft have found signs of organic compounds that arose on the surface of Ceres, a dwarf planet one-fourth the diameter of our moon in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. The compounds’ origins may provide clues about how life on Earth got started.

09 Jun 2017

Red Planet Roundup: June 2017

With two rovers patrolling the surface of Mars, six spacecraft orbiting above it, and scientists here on Earth studying the Red Planet from afar, new findings are announced often. Here are a few of the latest updates.

08 Jun 2017

Mineral Resource of the Month: Fluorspar

Fluorspar, or fluorite, occurs in a variety of geological environments and is deposited under a wide range of chemical and physical conditions, but commercial sources are primarily hydrothermal. The most common deposits occur as veins, mantos (replacement strata-bound orebodies) or replacement deposits. Other important deposits include stockworks and fillings in shattered zones, carbonatite and alkalic rock complexes, residual concentrations resulting from the weathering of primary deposits, and recoverable gangue in base metal deposits.

07 Jun 2017

Horses evolved to get along: Competition between species not main evolutionary driver

Horses have changed size and shape dramatically over the last 20 million years, evolving from small dog-sized creatures with multiple toes into the large, hoofed grazing animals we see today. But the factors that drove these changes have been unclear. In a new study in Science, scientists tested the long-held theory that horses evolved rapidly to compete with one another during the worldwide expansion of grasslands starting 18 million years ago.

07 Jun 2017

The mackerel year: Tambora changed how New England fished

The 1815 eruption of Indonesia’s Tambora Volcano led to a 1- to 1.5-degree-Celsius drop in the average global temperature, prompting 1816 to be called the “year without a summer.” New research analyzes weather data and historical records from New England to explain why, in the northeast U.S., 1816 was also called the “mackerel year.” As eruption-induced extreme weather triggered food scarcity in some areas, including a reduction in alewife numbers along the U.S. Atlantic coast, fishermen in the Gulf of Maine turned to mackerel fisheries farther offshore that had been neglected while more easily fished coastal and freshwater species were available.

06 Jun 2017

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