Taxonomy term

july 2014

Hell Creek Formation reveals a 'chicken from hell'

The Late Cretaceous landscape was a scary place, populated by TyrannosaursVelociraptors and a newly described ostrich-sized predator nicknamed the “chicken from hell.” The discovery of three specimens in the Hell Creek Formation in North and South Dakota that add up to a nearly complete skeleton is giving paleontologists their first good look at Anzu wyliei, a 66-million-year-old theropod related to Oviraptors.

16 Jul 2014

Benchmarks: July 15, 1806: Zebulon Pike launches Southwest expedition

Of America’s early 19th-century western explorers, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark typically garner the most attention. But there was a third military man who, along with a detachment of U.S. Army troops and volunteers, also trekked into the newly acquired reaches of the young United States in the same era: Zebulon Pike.

15 Jul 2014

People's earthquake reports influenced more by locomotion than location

In this era of high-tech seismic networks and GPS, scientists still rely on low-tech earthquake intensity scales, generated from public surveys like the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Did You Feel It? questionnaire, to characterize ground shaking in places with low instrument coverage. But how accurate are people’s perceptions of shaking? 

15 Jul 2014

A watery surprise from Earth's depths: Mineral provides first direct evidence for water in mantle's transition zone

From a depth of more than 500 kilometers, Earth has coughed up a water-bearing mantle mineral never before found on the surface. The surprise finding suggests the planet’s interior holds more water than all its oceans combined, and could help explain how Earth’s massive tectonic plates move.

14 Jul 2014

Ancient food web shows modern structure

All animals have to eat, but who eats whom or what is often difficult for ecologists to discern in modern habitats, let alone in extinct ecosystems. Now a new study focusing on an exceptional assemblage of 48-million-year-old fossils in Germany has pieced together one of the most complex food webs ever constructed, and the results show this ancient ecosystem was strikingly similar to today’s food webs.

11 Jul 2014

On the Web: Ka-pow! Superhero short films get kids thinking about climate change

The Green Ninja may sound like a spin-off of the “Power Rangers,” the live-action children’s television series featuring color-coded superheroes. But there’s a little less punch and a lot more thought going into this YouTube science show for kids.

10 Jul 2014

Solar wind gives lightning a boost

Strong gusts of solar wind appear to trigger lightning on Earth, according to a new study. Researchers studying patterns of lightning strikes in and around the U.K. over several years found a substantial uptick in lightning after high-speed streams of solar wind reached Earth. Given the regular timing of the streams’ arrivals and our ability to detect them with satellites, the findings could eventually help scientists better forecast lightning activity, potentially mitigating the hazard it poses to humans.

10 Jul 2014

Mars Monthly

As Curiosity and Opportunity rove around Mars, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), Mars Express and Mars Odyssey orbit above, and scientists on Earth study the Red Planet from afar, new findings are announced almost weekly. Here are a few of the latest updates.
 

10 Jul 2014

Mineral Resource of the Month: Niobium

Niobium, also called columbium, is a transition metal with a very high melting point. It is in greatest demand in industrialized countries, like the United States, because of its defense-related uses in the aerospace, energy and transportation industries. Niobium is used mostly to make high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steel and stainless steel. HSLA steels are used in large-diameter pipes for oil and natural gas pipelines and automobile wheels.

09 Jul 2014

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