Taxonomy term

geology

El Nino "flavors" affect California rainfall

Twenty years ago, the 1997–98 El Niño surpassed the 1982–83 event to become the strongest El Niño ever recorded, contributing to famine and drought in Southeast Asia, devastating floods in Southern California, and other natural disasters. By many metrics, the 2015–16 El Niño bested both to claim the title of the strongest El Niño on record. This most recent event, nicknamed the “Godzilla El Niño,” did contribute to extreme weather in parts of the world, including disastrous fires in Indonesia and the longest, global coral-bleaching event on record. However, it did not have the anticipated effect on California, which, at the time, was in the midst of a severe multi-year drought. In a recent study, researchers suggest the 2015–16 El Niño was the wrong “flavor” to bring heavy precipitation to the state.

13 May 2018

Geologic evidence confirms existence of 405,000-year Milankovitch cycle

Earth’s rock record preserves evidence of numerous natural processes, from evolution and extinction to catastrophes and climate change, and sometimes even planetary configurations. In a new study, a well-preserved sequence of Triassic lake sediments bearing evidence of cyclical patterns of climate change in the Newark Basin confirms the existence of a Milankovitch cycle — a periodic change in the shape of Earth’s orbit caused by, in this case, Earth’s gravitational interactions with Jupiter and Venus. The finding can be used to precisely date other events in the geological record, and inform climate and astronomical models.

11 May 2018

Oceanic crust in all its glory

Our loop drive through the high Hajar Mountains boasted excellent exposures of every oceanic crustal layer. One good exposure of the sequence of mantle rocks is found in the hills surrounding Oman’s capital city Muscat. They consist of a variety of peridotite called harzburgite, which is the pyroxene-depleted residue left behind after basaltic magma is extracted. That extracted magma forms the oceanic crust, whose characteristic rock sequence is, from bottom to top: 1) dark, layered gabbro overlain by massive gabbro (the intrusive equivalent of basalt that comprises solidified magma chambers); 2) sheeted basaltic dikes (the conduits that transported lava from the magma chambers up to the ocean floor); and 3) bulbous pillow lavas, which form when basalt erupts directly into seawater.

06 May 2018

Getting there and getting around Oman

Oman’s main gateway is Muscat International Airport (MCT), which offers service to most major Middle Eastern and European cities. There are no direct flights to Oman from North America; it’s usually most convenient to fly through Dubai, Doha, Bahrain or a major European city. Emirates, Qatar Airways, Gulf Air, Oman Air and Turkish Airlines are among those that offer connecting service.

06 May 2018

Travels in Geology: Northern Oman: Stunning canyons, towering dunes and the world's largest ophiolite

The small, politically stable sultanate of Oman hosts the world’s biggest and most intact ophiolite — a rare slice of oceanic crust emplaced on land — as well as stunning canyons, turquoise swimming holes, lush palm oases, Bronze Age tombs, endangered sea turtles and endless fields of sand dunes.
 
06 May 2018

Benchmarks: May 3, 2003: New Hampshire's Old Man of the Mountain falls

On May 2, 2003, the Old Man of the Mountain, New Hampshire’s famous face-shaped granite formation, adorned the side of Cannon Mountain in Franconia Notch State Park, just as it had for millennia. But by the next morning, it was gone: The iconic stone face had fallen.

03 May 2018

Geoscience on Film: The Burma Arc in Myanmar

Doug Prose has co-produced documentaries showcasing Earth and the geosciences with his partner and wife, Diane LaMacchia, through their nonprofit Earth Images Foundation since 1992. Their latest documentary, “The Himalaya Connection,” began airing on PBS stations in April. Prose has previously written and blogged for EARTH about the pair’s experience shooting and preparing “Connection,” which involved six separate trips to Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Mongolia and Nepal from 2011 to 2016. They recently traveled back to the region for their next project.

02 May 2018

Ice (Re)Cap: May 2018

From Antarctica to the Arctic; from polar caps, permafrost and glaciers to ocean-rafted sea ice; and from burly bears to cold-loving microbes, fascinating science is found in every nook and crevasse of Earth’s cryosphere, and new findings are announced often. Here are a few of the latest updates.

02 May 2018

Slumgullion: Colorado's natural 'lab' offers insights into landslides worldwide

In southwestern Colorado, a centuries-old landslide (first identified as such in 1883 by an infamous prospector and purported cannibal) is offering geologists an ideal laboratory to study slow-moving slides.

27 Apr 2018

Radium levels suggest Arctic Ocean chemistry is changing

Rising temperatures have already caused changes in the Arctic environment, like diminishing sea ice and thawing permafrost. Now, it appears that sea-ice loss could be throwing Arctic Ocean chemistry out of whack.

24 Apr 2018

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