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geology

Travels in Geology: The geological riches of Quebec's Gaspe Peninsula

A drive around Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula — bordered by the St. Lawrence River to the north and Chaleur Bay to the south — reveals a rugged coastline dotted with quaint fishing villages, ancient rock formations and an abundance of Devonian-aged fossils that draw amateur and professional geologists alike.
14 Dec 2017

Geologic Column: Dams in distress

The United States has more than 90,000 dams, with an average age of 50 years. Recent failures highlight the potential for catastrophe and the need for infrastructure maintenance. 

12 Dec 2017

Down to Earth With: Volcanologist Jess Phoenix

Field geologists usually love camping, hiking and all things outdoors. Today, Jess Phoenix is no different, but she wasn’t always that way. As a child growing up in Colorado, she bucked traditional backpack-wearing pursuits. “I would take the horses on trail rides and that was probably the most outdoorsy thing that I did,” Phoenix says. Instead, she took after the athletic interests of her parents, both FBI agents, playing “every sport under the sun.”

11 Dec 2017

Red Planet Roundup: December 2017

With two rovers patrolling the surface of Mars, six spacecraft orbiting above it, and scientists here on Earth studying the Red Planet from afar, new findings are announced often. Here are a few of the latest updates.

08 Dec 2017

Geomedia: Gifts: Holiday Gift Guide

There’s never a shortage of geeky pop-culture merchandise and gift ideas available, but sometimes it’s hard to find clever items that are less “Guardians of the Galaxy” and more about the actual galaxy. If you have science lovers on your holiday shopping list, look no further than EARTH’s Holiday Gift Guide for ideas — from space soap to science board games — that are sure to surprise and delight.

07 Dec 2017

Benchmarks: December 5, 1952: The Great Smog smothers London

On Friday, Dec., 5, 1952, a blanket of thick, yellow smog settled over London, cloaking the city for five days straight. Smog wasn’t uncommon — Londoners called these days “pea-soupers,” based on the yellow-black color — and there were notable smog episodes from the Industrial Revolution (late 1700s) through the 1950s. But the haze of the city’s infamous “Great Smog” of 1952 long overstayed its visit. The lingering smog killed thousands, and its residual effects lasted for decades.

05 Dec 2017

Comment: Arctic warming and midlatitude weather: Is there a connection?

Over the last few decades, the Arctic has warmed more than the rest of the planet, but is this Arctic amplification influencing weather patterns in the middle latitudes?
04 Dec 2017

What drives hot spots of sea-level rise?

As sea levels creep up around the world, scientists have observed hot spots where regional rates of sea-level rise greatly outpace the global average. But what drives the formation of these hot spots, and how long they last, have been mysteries. In a new study, scientists tracking sea levels along the Florida coast suggest that the combined effects of two naturally occurring climate processes, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), control sea-level hot spot formation along the U.S. East Coast.

01 Dec 2017

Caldera clays may hold key to lithium independence

Most of the world’s lithium is mined in South America and Australia. New research suggests that the United States may have its own untapped lithium supplies in lake deposits in the calderas left behind by large volcanic eruptions. In the study, published in Nature Communications, researchers detail a new way to detect deposits of the silvery white metal in places such as Crater Lake in southern Oregon.

28 Nov 2017

Antimony may have poisoned Pompeii's drinking water

The ancient Romans may have had advanced water distribution systems, but the water pipes they used were highly toxic. Many Roman-era water pipes were lined with lead, leading some archaeologists to suspect a public health crisis among Romans that may have contributed to the empire’s eventual fall. But others point out that the high levels of calcium carbonate in the Romans’ water supply would have quickly coated the pipes with scale, limiting the exposure of drinking water to lead. However, a new study suggests lead wasn’t the only concern: A sample of pipe from Pompeii dating to A.D. 79 has shown that the Italian city’s drinking water may have also contained alarmingly high levels of antimony. Antimony is an acutely poisonous element, ingestion of which can lead to severe vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration and/or death from ailments such as kidney failure and cardiac arrhythmia.

23 Nov 2017

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