Taxonomy term

august 2014

Benchmarks: August 15, 1984 & August 21, 1986: African killer lakes erupt

Only three lakes in the world are known to explosively release dissolved gases from their bottom waters. All three are in Africa; two have erupted with deadly consequences.
 

18 Aug 2014

Mineral Resource of the Month: Arsenic

Arsenic is a gray metal rarely encountered as a free element, but is widely distributed in minerals and ores that contain copper, iron and lead. Arsenic is often found in groundwater as a result of the natural weathering of rock and soil.

16 Aug 2014

Energy Notes: March 2013-2014

Oil and petroleum imports data are preliminary numbers taken from the American Petroleum Institute’s Monthly Statistical Report. For more information visit www.api.org.

 

16 Aug 2014

Geologic Column: How T. rex got its street cred back

Apparently, T. rex was in danger of losing its street cred as the scariest meat-eating hunter of all time. Until a recent discovery, the lumbering giant was being dissed as a sneaky scavenger. Forensic paleontologists to the rescue!

16 Aug 2014

Geomedia: 'Dinosaur 13' chisels away at the story behind discovery of Sue

The famous Tyrannosaurus rex "Sue" made headlines in the early 1990s, not only for being the most complete T. rex skeleton ever found, but also for the human drama that unfolded after the discovery. The story is the focus of a new documentary, "Dinosaur 13."

15 Aug 2014

Comment: Energy 360: Let science speak, not agendas

Ideally, science is objective and without bias. But realistically, some bias, in the form of predetermined inclination, is unavoidable. Thus it falls on scientists to disclose our biases and potential conflicts, and to do our utmost to be objective.

15 Aug 2014

Africa's impact is one that even the dinosaurs would have seen coming

The crater left by the infamous Chicxulub asteroid responsible for finishing off the dinosaurs about 65 million years ago, was more than 19 kilometers deep and 177 kilometers in diameter. Those dimensions correspond to a huge energy release estimated at 100 teratons of TNT, but that’s puny compared to an impact that struck South Africa’s Barberton Greenstone Belt about 3.26 billion years ago. Now, researchers have estimated just how big that massive asteroid was and the catastrophic effect it might have had on Earth and its budding plate tectonic system.

14 Aug 2014

Unprecedented low water-vapor levels detected on exoplanets

In a recent study, a team of astronomers found that the atmospheres of Jupiter-sized planets located outside of the solar system are much drier than predicted. The discovery has raised questions about the commonly held understanding of the processes involved in planet formation.

13 Aug 2014

La Brea climate adaptation as different as cats and dogs

The La Brea tar pits are famous for being a predator trap. For every herbivore, a dozen or more carnivores are pulled from the prolific Pleistocene fossil site in downtown Los Angeles. Two new studies focusing on the two most common species found at the tar pits — dire wolves and saber-toothed cats — are characterizing how the tar pits’ two top predators coped with the warming climate toward the end of the last ice age, and the results are surprisingly dissimilar: While the wolves got smaller, the cats got bigger.

12 Aug 2014

Are slow-slip earthquakes under Tokyo stressing faults?

More than 13 million people live in Tokyo, a city that has been devastated by earthquakes in the past and is likely to be rocked again. Since the massive magnitude-9 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in March 2011, recurrence intervals for nondamaging slow-slip quakes beneath Japan's capital have shortened. And that has left seismologists to wonder if this aseismic creep could be signaling a countdown to Tokyo's next "big one."

07 Aug 2014

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