Taxonomy term

allison mills

Polar dino tracks show full ecosystem

Researchers recently uncovered a new dinosaur tracksite in Alaska’s Denali National Park. The well-preserved Late Cretaceous footprints were left by duck-billed dinosaurs called hadrosaurs. Most of the tracks are incredibly detailed, and some even show some skin impressions; they represent animals of various ages. Given the wealth of data, the tracks provide insight into the herd dynamics and paleobiology of the greenhouse-world Arctic.

28 Nov 2014

Down to Earth With: CEO and Geo-Data miner Nicole Barlow

Miners are the classic geo-entrepreneurs. Nicole Barlow is a new kind of geo-entrepreneur: She also mines — but instead of rocks, she digs into dark data. That’s all the information stored away in file cabinets, boxes and geological survey store rooms. And instead of finding gold or silver, she uncovers nuggets of information and digitizes old documents.

18 Nov 2014

Seismic friction causes fault iridescence

Although iridescent spots on rocks in Utah’s Wasatch Fault Zone were first recognized two decades ago, scientists haven’t understood their origin, until now. New research shows that the iridescence appears on fault surfaces subjected to flash heating from friction and that the spots can provide clues to ancient seismic events. 

11 Nov 2014

Ohio millers imported French stone

What’s the difference between France and Ohio? A few fossils. Common Ohio chert looks like a rock called French buhr found around Paris, except for a couple of fossils. Researchers say these fossils can be used to distinguish the Ohio flint from its often-misidentified French lookalike.

04 Nov 2014

Russian earthquake ruptures superfast and deep

A “superfast” magnitude-6.7 earthquake was detected off the coast of Kamchatka, Russia, in May. The earthquake, called a “supershear” quake, is one of a handful of superfast earthquakes noted by researchers over the years, but this is the first identified at such great depth.

24 Oct 2014

Harpooning space debris

Harpooning was first used to spear fish, and later whales, but has yet to be used in space. Now, the European Space Agency (ESA) is considering the ancient technique to capture rogue satellites interfering with important orbits.

18 Oct 2014

Mercury formed by hit and run?

The solar system was once as busy as a store parking lot on Black Friday. Collisions were common in the early days, and new evidence of a hit-and-run scenario may explain some of Mercury’s peculiarities.

17 Oct 2014

Acid rain recovery in the Northeast

Four decades after the passage of the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, the acid rain that plagued the Northeast is still diminishing. The amount of sulfate and nitrate found in Northeastern lakes is not only declining, but the decrease has been speeding up, according to a long-term study recently published in Environmental Science & Technology.

10 Oct 2014

Benchmarks: October 10, 1913: Atlantic and Pacific waters meet in the Panama Canal

On Oct. 10, 1913, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson pressed a button in his Washington, D.C., office. At that moment, more than 6,400 kilometers away, about seven metric tons of dynamite exploded, clearing the final obstruction in the Panama Canal. Deep within the Culebra Cut, waters from the Atlantic Ocean finally met waters from the Pacific Ocean, marking the end of major construction on the 77-kilometer-long canal.

09 Oct 2014

Shallow crust magma with a dash of salt and peperite

Magma and salt are not often paired on the menu of geology. But, occasionally, the two do mix — with surprising results. Researchers explored these interactions in a new study, the first to examine how magma emplacement occurs in salt formations.

02 Oct 2014

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