Taxonomy term

Voices

Beyond rocks for jocks: Elevating geoscience education

Geoscientists can help alter the perception that some high school and college geoscience courses are less rigorous or demanding than other science courses.

15 May 2014

Geologic Column: Riding the rails to Omaha with Rudolf Clausius

It was the German physicist Rudolf Clausius who, in 1850, dressed the Second Law in a tuxedo to show us that the pigpen was infinite. He said, “the entropy of the universe strives to reach a maximum.” That is a beautifully concise vision of our fate with the clear message that in the grand scheme of things, there is no escape. We’re all doomed and can do nothing about it. All order in the universe will degenerate into chaos.

14 May 2014

Comment: The Oso landslide shows need for insurance and better planning

The deadly landslide that struck near Oso, Wash., in March killed more than 40 people and caused tens of millions of dollars in damage, most of which was not covered by insurance. The landslide was not a surprise to geologists. Could this disaster have been prevented — or can future disasters be prevented?

06 May 2014

Geologic Column: Data security: freezers, floppies and flash drives

In the olden days, many of us protected our field notes, lab records and draft manuscripts by making multiple photocopies, storing them in different places, and perhaps keeping one in the freezer in case of fire. Today, much of our data is collected and stored electronically. What strategies do we use now to protect against catastropic loss?

23 Mar 2014

IPCC: A failure in communicating the impact of new findings

In October, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its Summary for Policymakers (SPM) to accompany the report of Working Group I on the physical science evidence for a warming planet. The SPM is designed to be the headline-grabbing addendum to the main report, written in plain language for nonscientists: policymakers, the media and the public. It is supposed to explain the findings of the unwieldy main report in a clear, concise manner. It fails to do so.

10 Mar 2014

Bare Earth Elements: EARTH's Top 10 online stories of 2013 ... (Yes, it's a list)

Although there have been a lot of “best of 2013” and "year-in-review" lists posted recently, there haven’t been many focusing specifically on stories the geosciences. EARTH's staff hopes you find time to enjoy one more list with this quick look back at some of our popular pieces from the past year.

31 Dec 2013

Energy 360: Moving energy - No easy feat, but a vital conversation

Trucks, trains, planes and boats move food, clothing, cars, wood, steel, medical products, smartphones, bicycles, organic milk, free-range chickens—basically all consumer goods. And energy is no exception. Coal is mined and then carried to where it is burned. Oil and natural gas are moved from where they are produced to where they can be refined into transportation fuels and myriad other products, and then moved again. Uranium is mined and transported to create fuel rods for nuclear power plants or nuclear-powered ships.

23 Dec 2013

Geologic Column: Beer's secret ingredient: geology

Geologists have a long history with beer. Earlier this year, I decided to raise my own beer appreciation to the next level and take a class on the subject. I attended the beer school at the Anheuser-Busch Brewery in St. Louis. A few minutes into the class, our instructor noted that the beer-brewing process uses clean water, which, he said, is basically the same no matter where you are. Unfortunately, that got us off on the wrong foot.

20 Dec 2013

Tackling "Boundary Faults" across the Alaska-Yukon border: A report from the field

Our two dusty trucks roll across the airstrip, casting long, late-May shadows down the runway. We spot our colleagues from the Yukon Geological Survey and realize we’ve found the right place after an exhausting 12-hour drive from Anchorage punctuated by several U-turns to find the right unmarked access driveway off the Alaska Highway at the south end of Kluane Lake. The evening air is crisp, and the towering peaks to the south are capped with snow.

15 Oct 2013

A personal plea

On Oct. 29, Gary Szatkowski, the meteorological chief at the National Weather Service office in Mt. Holly, N.J., issued this personal plea to residents in his area:

13 Sep 2013

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