Taxonomy term

Voices

Comment: What's a map worth? The big cost and bigger benefit of three-dimensional elevation data

The 3-D Elevation Program is a collaborative effort to share the costs of collecting three-dimensional elevation data over the entire U.S. over an eight-year period. The end goal is a fully three-dimensional elevation map of the entire U.S. and its territories.

30 Jun 2016

Geoscience on Film: The view from outside Kathmandu

Doug Prose and Diane LaMacchia have produced documentaries showcasing Earth and the geosciences since 1992. At work on a project delving into the complex interplay of tectonics, natural hazards and humanity in the Himalayan region, LaMacchia and Prose traveled to Nepal and Bhutan in June to investigate recovery and resilience in the aftermath of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake. Prose wrote about their recent experiences while there, and filed the following series of posts upon returning home.

29 Jun 2016

Saving Mongolian wildlife, 80 million years after extinction

In the time of Velociraptor, 80 million years ago, southern Mongolia looked surprisingly like the Gobi Desert that exists there today. Animals roamed, nested and fought amid an arid climate while sand-soaked winds battered rocky outcrops. Today, walking along the Flaming Cliffs of Bayanzag, you may only notice one stark difference: Where Velociraptor and other dinosaurs once thrived, there are now only a few fossilized remains. And even those are endangered. Because of this, a small team of scientists, hired staff and volunteers is heading to Mongolia this fall to try to save them. 

27 Jun 2016

Geoscience on Film: Revisiting an earthquake-ravaged region, one year on

Doug Prose and Diane LaMacchia have produced documentaries showcasing Earth and the geosciences since 1992. At work on a project delving into the complex interplay of tectonics, natural hazards and humanity in the Himalayan region, LaMacchia and Prose traveled to Nepal and Bhutan in June to investigate recovery and resilience in the aftermath of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake. Prose wrote about their recent experiences while there, and filed the following series of posts upon returning home.

24 Jun 2016

Geologic Column: Geology for the people: Finding new paths to public outreach

The authors suggest novel ways to reach and share geologic knowledge with constituencies in your community who may not otherwise be exposed to geology.

28 May 2016

Comment: Assessing the threat from massive rock slope failures in the Norwegian fjordlands

Records dating back to the Vikings describe large rock avalanches into Norwegian fjords that set off lethal displacement waves. Today, increased development and tourism are exacerbating the risk.

21 May 2016

Geologic Column: May: Nature's forces in collision

Throughout history, May 1 has probably had more festivals and events associated with it than any other day of the year, from celebrations of spring and fertility to a day of protest for workers’ rights.

29 Apr 2016

Comment: GAVRT: Learning science by doing science

Students from kindergarten through high school have an opportunity to operate the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope, helping them learn science by participating in real scientific campaigns.

22 Apr 2016

Geologic Column: At the end of the Earth

A trip to Land’s End in Spain with some old friends spurs the author’s thinking about the tectonics of Iapetus, peat bogs that hold clues to ancient climate, and the futility of tilting at windmills.

13 Apr 2016

Comment: How long have humans been altering Earth's climate?

The early anthropogenic hypothesis holds that greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture, as early as 7,000 years ago, kept the Holocene climate warmer than it otherwise would have been.

08 Apr 2016

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