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Growing up saber-toothed: Strong from the start

During the Pleistocene, saber-toothed cats were formidable predators, with their massive canines and powerful front legs sporting razor-sharp claws. The bones of saber-toothed cats are thicker and more robust compared to those of other large cats, both modern and extinct. And previous studies of Smilodon have shown that their forelimbs in particular featured several adaptations, including thickened cortical bone, which would have increased strength, presumably useful in subduing ambushed prey.

19 Feb 2018

Did mud volcanoes set the stage for Burgess Shale fossils?

Canada’s Burgess Shale is famous for a wide array of exquisitely preserved 500-million-year-old fossils, which are found in a dozen localities in the Canadian Rockies. Linking all these localities today is a geologic feature called the Cathedral Escarpment, which formed in the Cambrian as a steep line of underwater cliffs where regular mudslides are thought to have gently buried a diversity of organisms, setting the stage for the prolific fossil beds. However, new mineralogical clues found at several of the fossil-rich sites suggest that mud volcanism may have also played a starring role in creating the Burgess Shale.

16 Feb 2018

Red Planet Roundup: February 2018

With two rovers patrolling the surface of Mars, six spacecraft orbiting above it, and scientists here on Earth studying the Red Planet from afar, new findings are announced often. Here are a few of the latest updates.

09 Feb 2018

Fossil sea turtle hatchling reveals its Eocene proteins

study of a 54-million-year-old sea turtle hatchling found in Denmark is adding to a growing body of evidence that certain proteins can remain intact in the fossil record for tens of millions of years.

08 Feb 2018

Double-dip La Nina blamed for Colorado's dry winter

In January 2017, skiers at Wolf Creek Ski Area in southern Colorado were enjoying a base snow depth of more than 350 centimeters — enough snow to cover most rocks and other obstacles. But this year, as of mid-January, the runs were much sparser, with the base barely clearing 100 centimeters. Powderhorn Resort in western Colorado was so bereft of snow that it had yet to open in mid-January — a month behind their usual December opening. Statewide the snowpack is slim enough to worry not only skiers, but also the state’s climatologists and water resource managers, who held a Water Availability Task Force (WATF) meeting on Jan. 18 to discuss the state’s snowpack and water outlook.

06 Feb 2018

Fossil reefs show sea level rose in bursts

Off the coast of Texas, a collection of fossil coral reefs sits under 60 meters of water — relics from 20,000 years ago, when the sea surface was much lower than today. In a new study, researchers created high-resolution maps of the reefs that suggest they drowned as sea levels rose in rapid bursts — each lasting decades to centuries — instead of at a steady rate, as has long been assumed.

06 Feb 2018

Isotopes suggest ancient turquoise mine was prolific

Few minerals are more iconic in the Desert Southwest than turquoise. The blue-green gemstone, which offers a stark contrast to the dusty red southwestern deserts, has been coveted for thousands of years by indigenous peoples, conquering Spaniards and now by a growing market around the world. Despite its past and present cultural significance, especially among indigenous populations, little is known about the early history of turquoise mining. Researchers have now uncovered previously unknown details about a historic turquoise mining site in Arizona that suggest it was more prolific than once thought.

05 Feb 2018

Ice age didn't freeze Florida's category 5 hurricanes

A new study looking at turbidites off the coast of Florida shows that category 5 hurricanes may still have battered Florida even during the chilly conditions of the Younger Dryas, about 12,000 years ago, at the end of the last ice age.

01 Feb 2018

Looking under Lusi: Indonesian mud volcano linked to nearby volcanic complex

On May 29, 2006, a massive mud eruption in East Java, Indonesia, began spewing as much as 180,000 cubic meters — the volume of 72 Olympic-sized swimming pools — of hot muddy debris each day from several vents, quickly burying nearby villages and forcing the relocation of more than 60,000 people. Almost 12 years later, the eruption, nicknamed Lusi, continues to produce more than 80,000 cubic meters of mud a day, and nobody knows how long the oozing will continue. In a new study, however, scientists have gotten the clearest look yet of the roots of the mud volcano and its possible connection to a nearby volcanic complex that may be driving the eruption.

01 Feb 2018

Beavers preserve wetlands in water-stressed areas

Once considered detrimental to ecosystems and nuisances where, for example, dams flooded farmland, beavers have been rhetorically touted in recent years as a potential boon for wetland health and water conservation. Anecdotal accounts and qualitative findings have suggested beavers improve water quality and availability in drought-stressed ecosystems, but just how much influence they have was not known. In new research, scientists have examined two creeks in Nevada to directly measure how effective beaver dams are at slowing water flows and storing water through the dry summer months.

30 Jan 2018

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