Taxonomy term

Features

Diamonds and the Eocene climate of the Bell River Basin

Diamonds mined from the kimberlite pipes of the Lac de Gras diamond field in Northwest Territories, Canada, are among the world’s youngest known diamonds, dating from 75 million to 45 million years ago. In some cases, when the magmas that carried these diamonds to Earth’s surface encountered water-saturated rock at shallow depths, violent steam explosions called phreatomagmatic eruptions resulted. Such explosions can form volcanic craters known as maars, which often fill with water and accumulate lake sediment, along with soil and vegetation that collapse into them from their margins. In the case of the Panda kimberlite pipe at the Ekati Mine in the Lac de Gras area, maar sediments accumulated far below the surrounding terrain, such that they were later buried under glacial deposits rather than being eroded away by ice sheets during the past million years. Wood and other organic materials were entombed and preserved in their natural state, thereby preserving shreds of the Paleo-Bell River Basin.

25 Jul 2018

The Paleo-Bell River: North America's vanished Amazon

With similar geologic and tectonic histories, including a continuous mountain cordillera along their western margins, why does South America have a massive river draining a continentwide basin but North America does not? Before the Pleistocene, it did.
25 Jul 2018

Getting There And Getting Around Vancouver

Most visitors to Vancouver and the surrounding area arrive via Vancouver International Airport (YVR) or by road, approaching the city from the east along the Trans-Canada Highway or from a U.S. border post to the south. Although flights into YVR are often good value, especially as a stopover for trans-Pacific flights, it’s often cheaper for U.S. travelers to fly into Seattle, as we did, and then drive across the border. 

16 Jul 2018

Travels in Geology: From sea to sky in British Columbia

About 200 million years ago, myriad exotic terranes began accreting to form what is now British Columbia in southwest Canada. Today, the region’s tremendous topography, which rises from sea to sky over just a few kilometers, allows outdoor pursuits year-round.
16 Jul 2018

Hazards in paradise: Indonesia prepares for natural disasters

Indonesia is a lushly beautiful and tectonically active country that is prone to natural disasters, including eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, fires, floods, tornadoes and landslides. What is the country doing to monitor and prepare for such hazards and are those efforts working?

06 Jul 2018

Toxic treatments: Lead lingers in folk remedies

Despite drastic reductions in lead poisoning since the 1970s, some children are still being exposed to lead from atypical sources, including cosmetics and folk remedies with often-unknown origins. Medical geologists are on the case.

25 Jun 2018

Getting there and getting around England

From North America, the cheapest and most convenient access to the Jurassic Coast is via one of London’s major airports. Nonstop service to Heathrow (LHR) and Gatwick (LGW) airports is available from many major U.S. cities.From London, the easiest way to get to (and around) the Jurassic Coast is by renting a vehicle, assuming you’re comfortable driving on the left side of the road. Because Gatwick is located on London’s southern outskirts, it offers the best escape to England’s southern coast from the hustle and bustle of the city. 

18 Jun 2018

Travels in Geology: Mesozoic masterpiece: England's Jurassic Coast

England's southwestern shore is renowned for the nearly continuous 185-million-year record of Earth's history exposed in its sensational seacliffs, which record one of the world's best stratigraphic sequences from the Mesozoic Era.

18 Jun 2018

Getting there and getting around Idaho

If you’re interested in a trip down the Main Salmon, you have two options: put a trip together yourself, or hire a professional outfitter to take you.

06 Jun 2018

Travels in Geology: Rafting the Salmon River through the Idaho Batholith

Rafting down the Main Salmon River, which courses north and then west across northern Idaho, takes you by Precambrian metamorphics and the granites of the Idaho Batholith. Six to eight days later, your trip concludes as you float past what was once the edge of North America, and over former island arcs sutured onto the continent during the Mesozoic.
06 Jun 2018

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