Taxonomy term

Features

Disrupting the deep: Ocean warming reaches the abyss

Since the 1970s, just 7 percent of the heat associated with humancaused warming has melted snow and ice or warmed the land and atmosphere. The other 93 percent was absorbed by the oceans, where temperatures are now increasing at nearly all latitudes and depths, threatening to fundamentally alter our planet by disrupting ocean circulation. 
20 Mar 2018

Travels in Geology: Corsica: A fusion of cultures on the Mediterranean's most mountainous isle

The rugged topography of the island of Corsica, off the coast of France and Italy, is a blend of rocks of very different ages and origins thrust together during one of Earth's great tectonic uphevals. 
09 Mar 2018

Getting There & Getting Around Corsica

The two largest of Corsica’s four airports, Ajaccio (AJA) and Bastia (BIA), are located on the island’s southwestern and northeastern coasts, respectively. There are no direct flights from the U.S. to Corsica, so it’s usually cheapest and most convenient to fly into Paris and then catch a 1.5-hour flight to the island. Air France and Air Corsica operate connecting flights year-round from most major French cities. During the bustling summer months, other carriers, including the budget airlines EasyJet and Ryanair, offer direct service from numerous European cities. If you prefer to arrive by ferry, several lines, including Corsica Ferries and Moby Lines, offer year-round transport from Marseille, Nice and Toulon, as well as summer routes from several Italian ports.

 
09 Mar 2018

Creeping danger: Landslide threatens Peruvian village, especially when the earth quakes

A massive landslide has been encroaching on the village of Maca, Peru, since the 1980s. Today, it provides geologists with a laboratory to study slow-moving landslides, especially how they react to rainfall and earthquakes.
27 Feb 2018

How do earthquakes impact landslides?

Sensitive instruments installed on and near the slow-moving landslide in Maca, Peru, have allowed scientists to observe the response of the landslide to earthquakes: information that can help researchers predict hazards from other slow-moving landslides in the region and perhaps around the world. But scientists are wondering whether the findings could also shed light on the triggering of fast-moving landslides by earthquakes.

27 Feb 2018

Greenland's growing deltas: Combining historical and modern imagery to decode change in a telltale Arctic landscape

Greenland’s 1.7-million-squarekilometer ice sheet is shrinking. But how much meltwater and sediment drains from the ice sheet through rivers? Researchers are studying the island’s deltas to find out, and are getting help from some longforgotten aerial photos taken by the Danish Air Force in the 1930s.
20 Feb 2018

Travels in Geology: Las Vegas: The scenery beyond the slots

Beyond the Strip lie southern Nevada’s craggy limestone peaks, colorful sandstone canyons, and enormous conservation areas that, despite the searing desert heat, harbor a tremendous diversity of plants and wildlife. From soaring summits and graceful bighorn sheep to prehistoric petroglyphs, this desert oasis has a lot to offer the geo-minded traveler.
14 Feb 2018

Getting there and getting around Las Vegas

McCarran International Airport is the main gateway for exploring Las Vegas and the surrounding area. Except for sights along the Strip, it’s necessary to rent a car to see the attractions described here. If you fly in, you can rent a vehicle at the airport or take a shuttle or taxi into the city and rent a car as needed. Although all of these sites are open year-round, the best times of year to visit are in the spring and fall. In winter, it’s not possible to hike high in the Spring Mountains due to snow, and in summer the valley heat can be stifling. There are currently no visitor facilities or infrastructure at Tule Springs National Monument, but you can catch a glimpse of the fossil beds near one of two National Park Service signs, one located at the intersection of Moccasin Road and Durango Drive, and the other where North Decatur Boulevard meets Horse Drive.

14 Feb 2018

Dividing line: The past, present and future of the 100th Meridian

In 1878, John Wesley Powell first advanced the idea that the climatic boundary between the United States’ humid East and arid West lay along the 100th meridian, which
runs from pole to pole and, today, cuts through six U.S. states. But what does it really mean, and what is its future?
22 Jan 2018

A flammable planet: Fire finds its place in Earth history

For hundreds of millions of years, wildfires have shaped the planet, from the plants, animals and ecosystems around us to the air we breathe. Yet scientists are only beginning to understand the planet’s fiery past. 
16 Jan 2018

Pages