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Features

Travels in Geology: Peninsular Greece: A gorgeous state of collapse

Peninsular Greece offers stunning scenery and extraordinary sights, including the temple at ancient Delphi, where geology helped produce the oracles' "visions"; Meteora's famed monastaries, perched atop pillars of conglomerate; and the precipitous heights of Mount Olympus.
12 Jan 2016

Getting there and getting around peninsular Greece

Northern Greece has two major airports: Athens and Thessaloniki. Athens International Airport offers the most options, including seasonal daily nonstop flights from New York, Philadelphia and Montreal, as well as flights to most European cities. 
 
12 Jan 2016

The question of mantle plumes

The mantle plume hypothesis is the most widely held explanation for volcanism far from plate boundaries, like Hawaii and Yellowstone. But some researchers question whether mantle plumes even exist.

20 Dec 2015

What lies below?

Technological advances continue to improve the resolution of our view of Earth’s interior, but disagreement remains over what we’re viewing. In a recent Nature paper titled, “Broad plumes rooted at the base of the Earth’s mantle beneath major hot spots,” Scott French, a computational scientist at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Barbara Romanowicz, a seismologist at the University of California at Berkeley, reported the development of the most detailed model yet of the structure of the mantle.
 
20 Dec 2015

The Snowmastodon Project: Mammoths and mastodons lived the high life in Colorado

In fall 2011, a bulldozer driver in Snowmass, Colo., unearthed an unprecedented trove of Pleistocene-aged fossils. Over the next few months, “Snowmastodon” became one of the largest fossil excavations ever. Scientists have already learned a lot from the bones.

13 Dec 2015

What happened here?

Why did so many animals end up buried at the Snowmastodon site? What happened to them? “We really struggled to figure out why there were so many bones found in this location,” says Ian Miller, chair of earth sciences and the paleobotanist at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science who co-led the Snowmastodon Project. “Was it some kind of deathtrap? Or was there a deadly catastrophe like an earthquake or a landslide?” 
 
13 Dec 2015

Volunteering to muck around in the mud

The Snowmastodon Project team pulled thousands of fossils out of snowy mud in a matter of months, a herculean task that would not have been as successful without a small army of volunteers, many of whom came from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science’s paleontology program. The program trains interested laypeople in the art of collecting, studying and curating fossils, one of the only programs like it in the world. 
 
13 Dec 2015

Working near Gorkha's epicenter

Hari Krishna Bhattarai works for the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in Nepal, as well as for Educating Nepal, an organization that aims to improve the education of Nepali schoolchildren. On Friday, April 24, Bhattarai was working at a field site in Gorkha, tending to various WWF-related projects and working with locals in the Gorkha region. The next day, April 25, was a Nepalese public holiday, so Bhattarai returned to his home city, Pokhara, near the Annapurna Massif. The Gorkha quake struck Saturday, doing little damage to Pokhara. On Monday, Bhattarai returned to the area near Barpak, where he had been working, to deliver relief supplies like beans and rice. 
 
06 Dec 2015

Narratives from Nepal: Relief and rebuilding after the Gorkha Earthquake

When a magnitude-7.8 earthquake struck Nepal on April 25, mountaineer Ben Erdmann was on a climbing expedition on Annapurna; meanwhile, seismologist Susan Hough and engineer Ajay Sitaula were at home in California and Colorado, respectively, watching the disaster unfold. Soon after, all would be on the ground in Nepal, involved in relief efforts or working to assess what happened — especially why the quake did not do as much damage as scientists expected it would.

06 Dec 2015

Travels in Geology: Sedona: A journey to the edge of a supercontinent

Built upon crimson slopes studded with junipers and towering pines, surrounded by soaring red rock spires, and encircled by 800,000 hectares of pristine national forest, the central Arizona town of Sedona is widely recognized for its natural beauty, diverse recreational opportunities, flourishing art scene and its role as a hub of New Age healing.

01 Dec 2015

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