Getting there and getting around Tumbler Ridge

Boulder Gardens is a domed sandstone peak overlying softer shale; the sandstone spalls off, creating a talus pile known as the gardens. Credit: Larry Erlendson. Boulder Gardens is a domed sandstone peak overlying softer shale; the sandstone spalls off, creating a talus pile known as the gardens. Credit: Larry Erlendson.

There are no direct commercial flights into Tumbler Ridge, which is about a 13-hour drive from Vancouver, B.C. However, Air Canada and WestJet fly from Vancouver into nearby Fort St. John, and from there, it is about a two-hour drive to Tumbler Ridge. Regional airline Central Mountain Air also flies from Vancouver into Dawson Creek, about a 90-minute drive from Tumbler Ridge. You can also fly into Edmonton, the capital of Alberta, a 6.5-hour drive, or Grande Prairie, a 2.5-hour drive.

Plan to visit between mid-May (or later) and the end of September. Outside of that time frame, the weather in northeastern British Columbia can be unpredictable, with snow not uncommon in the shoulder months of the season. The sites are usually cleared and fully accessible after the third week in May, but this year saw a late snowfall, so plan accordingly.

Accommodation options in Tumbler Ridge include camping, bed-and-breakfasts, a motor inn and two larger hotels. The small, welcoming community has multiple restaurant options as well, ranging from fast-food chains to pubs to full-service restaurants.

To help plan your hikes, check in with the Wolverine Nordic and Mountain Society, which leads guided hikes; their website can also be a good planning resource.

For other activities, including jet-boat tours with Wild River Adventure Tours or helicopter tours with Ridge Rotors, check out the Tumbler Ridge community website: http://visittumblerridge.ca/Tumbler-Ridge/Activities.

If you haven’t gotten your fill of dinosaurs yet, check out the Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum near Grande Prairie, Alberta, about 2.5 hours from Tumbler Ridge.

John Geary

Geary is a Vancouver, B.C.-based freelance travel writer and photographer who specializes in ecotourism and outdoor adventure. Some of his favorite journeys have taken place in the Alberta Badlands, canoeing, hiking, and riding horses through dinosaur country.

Friday, November 4, 2016 - 06:00

Did you know ...

EARTH only uses professional science journalists and scientists to author our content?  In this era of fake news and click-bait, EARTH offers factual and researched journalism. But EARTH is a non-profit magazine, and at least 10 times more people read EARTH than pay for it. As advertising revenues across the media decline, we need your help to ensure that we can continue bringing you the reliable and well-written coverage of earth science you know and love. Our goal is not only to inform our readers, but to inform decision makers across the economic and political spectrum about the science of our planet. So, we need your help. By becoming a subscriber or making a tax-deductible contribution to support EARTH, you can fund our writers and help make sure the world knows about our planet.

Make a contribution

Subscribe