Where on Earth? - July 2010

Clues for July 2010:
1. This long ridge of tilted sandstone marks the eastern edge of a great mountain range. Many different sections of the ridge have their own names: The broken, tilted rocks and sharp edges of the portion of the ridge pictured here earned this portion a sinister name.
2. The ridge gets part of its name from the swinish geological term for a homoclinal ridge. It was once a horizontal sedimentary layer, but was uplifted and steeply tilted about 30 million years ago, during part of a great mountain-building episode. Other softer sedimentary layers eroded away, leaving the tilted sandstone layer behind.
3. The portion of the ridge pictured here is just west of a sweetheart city. It is located in a designated Open Space wildlife habitat, with many rare plants.
Name the ridge, the portion pictured and the state in which it's located.
Scroll down for the answer
 
 
 
Answer: Devil’s Backbone, part of the Dakota Hogback ridge near Loveland, Colo., is a long ridge of tilted sandstone that marks the eastern edge of the Rockies. The Dakota Hogback derives its name from the geological term for a homoclinal ridge. Photo by Ulli Limpitlaw.
July winners
Bryant Bigelow (Johnstown, N.Y.)
Julie Brigham-Grette (Amherst, Mass.)
Sandi Cannon (San Marcos, Calif.)
V. Gornitz (New York, N.Y.)
Chris T. Higgins (Davis, Calif.)
Paula LaPoint (Chapel Hill, N.C.)
James Neal (Prescott, Ariz.)
David Pratt (Centre Hall, Pa.)
Daniel Sanger (North Huntingdon, Pa.)
Susan Soloyanis (Cascade, Colo.)
 
 
 

To submit your photographs to our Where on Earth? contest, send them via e-mail to
earth@earthmagazine.org.

23 Jul 2010