Where on Earth? - January 2012

Clues for January 2012:
1. This park hosts massive sandstone formations that geological evidence suggests are ancient solidified sand dunes that were later uplifted into a vertical position.
2. The ancient solidified sand dunes are the biggest formations in the park, supposedly formed in the Permian, and attract climbers, hikers and photographers.
3. A dinosaur fossil discovered here in 1878 was first identified as a Camptosaurus. In 2008, however, experts announced that the fossil was in fact a new species of dinosaur. Part of the species’ new name has Greek roots that relate to the name of this park.
 
Name the park and its location.
Scroll down for the answer
 
 
 
 
Answer: Garden of the Gods park in Colorado Springs, Colo., hosts massive sandstone formations that geological evidence suggests are ancient solidified sand dunes that were later uplifted into a vertical position. A dinosaur fossil discovered here in 1878 was first identified as a Camptosaurus. In 2008, however, experts announced that the fossil was in fact that of Theiophytalia kerri. The name has Greek origins: Theios meaning “belonging to the gods” and phytalia meaning “garden.” Photo is by Nicole Branan.
 
January winners
Jim Baichtal (Thorne Bay, Alaska)
Andy Caldwell (Roxborough, Colo.)
Barbara Gauthier-Warinner (Interlochen, Mich.)
Anita Robinson (Vancouver, Wash.)
Ben Wolfe (Olathe, Kan.)
 

To submit your photographs to our Where on Earth? contest, send them via e-mail to
earth@earthmagazine.org.

01 Jan 2012