World's longest sauropod trackway exposed

Excavations at a dinosaur trackway found in 2009 in the French village of Plagne, 200 kilometers east of Lyon, revealed 110 sauropod footprints spanning a distance of 155 meters, making the site the world’s longest sauropod trackway. In a new study published in the journal Geobios, researchers report that the tracks were made roughly 150 million years ago and that the largest tracks measure more than a meter across. Analysis of the trackway suggested the prints were left by an animal at least 35 meters long and weighing more than 35 tons, that traveled about 4 kilometers per hour with an average stride of 2.8 meters. The prints were assigned to a new ichnospecies — a species only known from trace fossils — named Brontopodus plagnensis.

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Mary Caperton Morton

Mary Caperton Morton

Morton (https://theblondecoyote.com/) is a freelance science and travel writer based in Big Sky, Mont., and an EARTH roving correspondent.  

Monday, March 5, 2018 - 06:00