Winter precipitation in southwestern U.S. tied to Kiwi Coast

Water supplies in the southwestern United States largely depend on winter precipitation. Predicting seasonal rain and snowfall is becoming more difficult, however, as climate change causes precipitation patterns to vary. A new study provides evidence of a strong correlation between late-summer to fall sea-surface temperatures off the coast of New Zealand and winter precipitation in the southwestern U.S. — a correlation that could help provide earlier and more reliable forecasts for the southwestern U.S., and improve water resource and ecosystem management in the region.

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Jennifer Georgek

Georgek is a freelance writer in Salt Lake City, Utah, a graduate student at the University of Utah, and an extern at EARTH.

Wednesday, November 21, 2018 - 06:00