Trip-planning resources

Shannon Falls can be seen from the Sea-to-Sky Highway, along which many of the field trip stops were located. Credit: International Association for Geoscience Diversity.Shannon Falls can be seen from the Sea-to-Sky Highway, along which many of the field trip stops were located. Credit: International Association for Geoscience Diversity.

If you are thinking of making one or more of your field trips accessible, the International Association for Geoscience Diversity (IAGD), an organization charged with advocating for students and geoscientists with disabilities, can help. The IAGD is establishing a consortium of accessible field courses, specifically developed to accommodate students with disabilities who are working to complete the field-based learning requirements of an undergraduate geoscience degree program. The IAGD can connect you with experienced students and faculty who can help you plan your accessible field course, design a new course or retrofit an existing one based on the diverse physical needs of your students. If you are interested in learning more about modifying or developing an accessible field course, or in promoting an accessible geoscience field course through the consortium, contact the IAGD at info@theiagd.org.

 

 

 

Christopher L. Atchison and Brett H. Gilley

Atchison is an assistant professor in the University of Cincinnati’s School of Education and the Department of Geology, specializing in geoscience education, and executive director of the International Association for Geoscience Diversity. Gilley works for the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative in the Earth and Ocean Sciences Department at the University of British Columbia. The authors wish to thank the sponsors of the trip, as well as colleagues Anthony Feig and Alison Stokes and the participants of the field trip.

Sunday, August 16, 2015 - 06:00