Travels in Geology: Navigating the rocks, reefs and waters of Bermuda

Picturesque beaches, beautiful weather and a pleasant mix of Caribbean and British cultures make Bermuda a popular tourist destination, especially in the winter. But it's also a place where geology and history are on full display. 

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Getting there and getting around Bermuda

Several major airlines serve Bermuda’s L.F. Wade International Airport, located on St. David’s Island about 30 minutes from Bermuda’s capital and largest city, Hamilton. Dozens of bus routes can take passengers to almost any place on the island, but getting to and from the airport — or anywhere with large suitcases — on the bus is frowned upon. Instead, take a taxi. Rental cars are not available to visitors. The alternative is scooters, but nerves of steel and good health insurance are a must for navigating the narrow, windy, high-speed roads. And although the island is small — less than two-thirds the size of Manhattan — and many places are within walking distance, few roads outside Hamilton have sidewalks or even shoulders. A handful of ferry routes can also help you reach some destinations.

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Sam Lemonick

Sam Lemonick (www.samlemonick.com) is a freelance writer based in Berkeley, Calif.

Friday, January 16, 2015 - 06:00

Sam Lemonick

Sam Lemonick (www.samlemonick.com) is a freelance writer based in Berkeley, Calif.

Friday, January 16, 2015 - 06:30

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