Travels in Geology: Cyprus: Island of Oceanic Crust

The soul of Cyprus, the third-largest island in the Mediterranean, lies in the Troödos Mountains — a rare, intact sliver of ancient oceanic crust that played a pivotal role in the development of plate tectonic theory. But don’t miss the Neolithic, Roman and Byzantine ruins, or the stunning beaches.

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Northern Cyprus' "Peace Water" Pipeline

With its semi-arid climate and growing population, Cyprus suffers from the highest level of water stress in Europe and is ranked in the top five most water-stressed countries in the world, according to the World Resources Institute. Demand in the larger southern Republic of Cyprus is predicted to increase to 314 million cubic meters per year by 2020, up from 266 million cubic meters in 2004.

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Terri Cook

Terri Cook

Based in Boulder, Colo., and trained as a geologist, Cook is a freelance writer whose career has focused on exploring and explaining the history of our amazing planet, including as a roving correspondent for EARTH. Follow her travels at www.down2earthscience.com. Follow her @GeoTravelTerri.

Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 06:00

Getting there and getting around Cyprus

Cyprus has been populated for centuries by a mix of ethnic Greeks and Turks. Periodic ethnic tensions erupted into communal violence in 1963, leading to a Turkish invasion in 1974. Turkey has controlled the northern third of the island ever since. The Troödos Mountains, which host the ophiolitic rocks, rise in the center of the island, within the Republic of Cyprus.
 

Full content for EARTH is available to subscribers. If you would like to gain access to the full version of this article, as well as all EARTH content, please subscribe today.

If you are connecting using a Library (IP-based) Subscription, please access full issues of the magazine through our Library Access portal.

Terri Cook and Lon Abbott

Terri Cook (www.down2earthscience.com) is a science and travel writer based in Colorado and an EARTH roving correspondent. Lon Abbott is a geology professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 06:00

Terri Cook and Lon Abbott

Terri Cook (www.down2earthscience.com) is a science and travel writer based in Colorado and an EARTH roving correspondent. Lon Abbott is a geology professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 06:00