Solar wind gives lightning a boost

Strong gusts of solar wind appear to trigger lightning on Earth, according to a new study. Researchers studying patterns of lightning strikes in and around the U.K. over several years found a substantial uptick in lightning after high-speed streams of solar wind reached Earth. Given the regular timing of the streams’ arrivals and our ability to detect them with satellites, the findings could eventually help scientists better forecast lightning activity, potentially mitigating the hazard it poses to humans.

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Timothy Oleson

Timothy Oleson

Tim is the news editor at EARTH, and writes the Bare Earth Elements blog. His scientific interests span the geosciences from biogeochemistry to seismology to space science. Formerly based in Madison, Wis., he now resides in the Washington, D.C., area.

Thursday, July 10, 2014 - 07:45