The River Runners' Route

Credit: Lon Abbott and Terri Cook Credit: Lon Abbott and Terri Cook

Havasu’s magnificent waterfalls are also accessible to Grand Canyon river runners, and a stop to experience Havasu Creek’s magical turquoise water is almost mandatory on any Colorado River rafting trip. 

It is typical to find 10 to 20 rafts anchored in the eddy at the creek’s mouth while rafters-turned-hikers pick their way up ledges of Cambrian-aged Muav Limestone to explore the magical stream above. Although only the most intrepid rafting parties tackle the entire 10-kilometer trail from the mouth of the creek to Mooney Falls, many stop off at intermediate points for shorter hikes. This gorgeous route includes a few short scrambles up and down cliffs where fixed ropes aid your progress. The first three-quarters of a kilometer offers straightforward hiking and wonderful scenery. More energetic hikers who wish to escape the crowds often choose to hike 6.5 kilometers from the Colorado River to Beaver Falls. More a cascade than a falls, Beaver’s beauty and its deep swimming hole both contribute prominently to its allure.

Terri Cook and Lon Abbott

Terri Cook (www.down2earthscience.com) is a science and travel writer based in Colorado and an EARTH roving correspondent. Lon Abbott is a geology professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Saturday, March 30, 2013 - 06:00