Meteorites did not spark Ordovician biodiversification

During the Ordovician Period, roughly 470 million years ago, an asteroid the size of a small moon collided with another rocky object in the belt between Mars and Jupiter, shattering the asteroid into billions of pieces. Fragments from the epic collision still occasionally fall to Earth today, making up a large share of the meteorites recovered. But in the immediate wake of the Ordovician event, many pieces rained down on the planet, settling on the surface and in layers of rock forming at the time. In a new study, researchers studying some of these meteorite-rich layers have refined the timescale for the collision. The results bring into question a proposed link between the meteorite bombardment and an evolutionary uptick known as the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE).

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Mary Caperton Morton

Mary Caperton Morton

Morton (https://theblondecoyote.com/) is a freelance science and travel writer based in Big Sky, Mont., and an EARTH roving correspondent.  

Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 06:00

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