Introducing Earth's inner inner core

A humongous hunk of iron — that’s how scientists have long thought of Earth’s solid inner core. But new research suggests there’s more to it than that: namely, that the inner part of the inner core may have different physical properties than the outer part. In addition to revealing a new feature in Earth’s layer-cake internal structure, the discovery may shed light on the planet’s formation, say the authors of the study, published in Nature Geoscience.
 

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Julia Rosen

Rosen holds a doctorate in geology and is a freelance science writer based in Portland, Ore. She has served as both an intern and an interim staff writer for EARTH, has also written for the Los Angeles Times and AGU’s Eos, and occasionally hosts 60-Second Science podcasts for Scientific American. Find more of her work at www.julia-rosen.com.

Monday, July 6, 2015 - 06:00