Great drying led to great dying down under

If not for the megafaunal extinctions that wiped out many large animals at the end of the Pleistocene, the world might be a very different place today — with humans coexisting alongside still-living saber-toothed tigers, woolly mammoths and 3-meter-tall birds. The agents of these mass extinctions have been debated for decades: Were shifting climates, or our spear-wielding ancestors mainly responsible? A new study of the receding shorelines of Australia’s largest lake has found that a substantial drying of the environment, more so than human pressure, is mostly to blame for the loss of megafauna down under.
 

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Mary Caperton Morton

Mary Caperton Morton

Morton (https://theblondecoyote.com/) is a freelance science and travel writer based in Big Sky, Mont., and an EARTH roving correspondent.  

Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 06:00