Geologic Column: A cautionary tale about "sleeping" natural hazards

The author ruminates on the sometimes underappreciated risks of natural hazards and recalls a trip to a remote Hawaiian campsite where a 1975 magnitude-7.7 quake later proved fatal.

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Wendell A. Duffield

Duff and his dog, Mele. Credit: courtesy of Wendell Duffield.

Duffield spent 30 years with the U.S. Geological Survey researching volcanoes, their hazards, and related geothermal energy resources. In “retirement” he is an adjunct professor of geology at Northern Arizona University at Flagstaff. For more on his writing and work, go to http://oak.ucc.nau.edu/wad3. The views expressed are his own.

Monday, November 12, 2018 - 06:00

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