Citizen science (and art)

Henok Getahun created this artistic interpretation — “Boy on Jupiter Catches Io” — from JunoCam images. Credit: NASA/Henok Getahun. Henok Getahun created this artistic interpretation — “Boy on Jupiter Catches Io” — from JunoCam images. Credit: NASA/Henok Getahun.

Juno carries a visible light camera, JunoCam, which is intended primarily to take photos that, it’s hoped, will provoke public interest in Jupiter. The images sent back are available for anyone to download and manipulate for scientific or artistic purposes. Thousands of images, both raw and manipulated, have been made available for viewing, and hundreds of citizen scientists have been engaged in the project. Scientists say they are delighted at how JunoCam has resonated and increased interest in, and understanding of, the Juno mission. See www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam.

Harvey Leifert

Leifert is a freelance science writer based in Bethesda, Md.

Monday, March 11, 2019 - 06:00

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