Benchmarks: July 1, 1912: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory officially becomes the first of its kind in U.S.

Living on the fringe of an active volcano in Hawaii is a precarious venture. Because Hawaii’s shield volcanoes aren’t prone to explosive activity, you’re typically not threatened by violent eruptions such as would occur at Mount St. Helens, for example. On the other hand, the slow-moving, unpredictable lava flows can still overtake your home, even if it has avoided years of previous eruptions. 
 

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Laurie J. Schmidt

Laurie J. Schmidt is a freelance science writer in Arizona. She was living in Hawaii during the 2011 tsunami and received a PTWC tsunami alert on her cell phone just minutes after the earthquake struck Japan.

Monday, July 2, 2012 - 06:00